Arlington Delivers a Bike Friendly(er) Ballston

Early last month, road crews set to work repaving a long stretch of N Quincy St. in Ballston. But, instead of putting it back exactly as they found it, they made it better. Quincy St. now sports almost a half mile of new, protected bike lanes between Glebe Rd and 9th St. N!

This is Awesome!

Check it out!

Tucked behind car parking and flex-posts, the new protected bike lanes create a low-stress bike connection to dozens of shops, restaurants, offices, apartments and the future Mosaic Park. Where bicyclists used to grapple with very close passing cars and parked cars blocking bike lanes, the new design gives everyone their own, orderly space on the road.

Before…

…and after!

This upgrade is the result of a lot of hard work by advocates and county staff. In late 2015, we launched our Bike Friendly Ballston campaign to build support for a low-stress, protected bike lane connection between the Custis Trail and Ballston’s commercial area. By spring 2016, we had earned support from more than 600 county residents, Ballston businesses, the Ballston Business Improvement District, and the Arlington County Board. Since then, county planners have been hard at work, collecting data, designing concepts, and negotiating the many tricky complications that arose along the way.

Making use of the new, protected bike lane in Ballston.

Help us show our gratitude!

The Quincy St. protected bike lanes are a big win for safe, low-stress bicycling in Arlington. And this project could not have happened without the creative solutions, persistence and dedication from transportation staff and county leaders. Will you help us thank them for their work?

Thank the Staff & Board!

This work completes the first half of our vision for a more bike friendly Ballston. Still to come is a protected bike lane connection extending another half-mile past the Central Library and Washington Lee High School to the Custis Trail. To learn more about the project and see the plans, visit the project page.

Anacostia Pedal Paddle Palooza!

Pedaling the Anacostia River Trail is just *one* of the ways to enjoy the Pedal Paddle Palooza!

It’s a pedal paddle palooza! Join the biggest watershed exploration party on September 29th to bike and kayak the Anacostia watershed. Start in Montgomery County, Prince George’s County or the District on bike and explore the trails to finish at Kingman Island.

Come to the river on September 29th!

Let us know you’re coming!

How much does it cost?

Nothing!

Where do I start?

We’ve got launch points in all three jurisdictions in the Anacostia watershed – start somewhere close to home or totally new to explore something different!

Montgomery County – Sligo Creek Park at Dennis Ave

Prince George’s County – University of Maryland

District of Columbia – 11th St Bridge

Do I need to start at a launch point?

Not required but definitely recommended. We have all the trail directions and event passports at the launch points. Raffle is only open to folks who have completed their passport book! And to be officially on the ride, there are bike waivers required that are only available at launch and paddle points.

Do I need to register?

We do require waivers to be signed for both kayaking and riding. They will be available at all launch and kayak points but also available for kayaking here. Save yourself the time outside for fun and do it ahead!

How long is this ride?

As long as you want! We’ve got activities throughout the Anacostia watershed on the trail but the average ride from a launch point to the central hub at Kingman Island is 10 miles. The trail follows the Anacostia River and water prefers to go downhill if possible, so the trail is pretty flat with a downhill trend towards the District.

When should I start?

All the launch points are open 10:00 am – 12:00 pm. The earlier you start, the cooler it will be and the less folks will probably be using the kayaks. If you pedaled straight from Sligo Creek Field (the farthest away launch point) to Kingman Island, it should take about 1 hour and 20 minutes. Add in the necessary time for stopping to smell the flowers, snack breaks and kayaking, what makes sense for your schedule?

Kayaks and paddles will be provided (for free!) on a first-come, first-serve basis.

What should I bring?

Folks who are joining us for the trail ride should have a working bicycle, helmet (insurance requirement) and a bike lock. There will be bike racks at all the kayak and motorized boat tour locations. Staff will be at all the paddle points to keep a cursory eye over your stuff – please be prepared to lock your bike. We recommend taking your phone and wallet with you in a small plastic baggie. Larger panniers, extra jackets, etc., should be safe on land. Although, please do not bring your family heirlooms or diamonds.

Folks who are kayaking should bring a small plastic baggie to keep valuables dry. A broad brimmed hat (baseball hat, etc) and sunglasses would be helpful to reduce glare and sunburn when you’re out in the water.

For everyone – please bring water, snacks, sunscreen and clothing to keep you safe outside for a few hours. Phones are also good for taking photos of our gorgeous watershed!

What’s the weather plan?

We don’t kayak or ride bikes during hazardous conditions such as lightning or thunderstorms. If dangerous storms roll over the area on Sept 29th, we will likely cancel the event. But other than that, we’ll be a go! Please bring the water, snacks, sunscreen, or clothing layers you need to keep safe outside.

What’s the scoop with the Sligo Creek launch point?

Precise address: Dennis Ave and Sligo Creek Trail (next to Sligo Creek Middle School)

Closest Metro: Forest Glen

Arriving by car: Car parking is at the Sligo Creek Middle School. Once you have parked, please follow the signs to the trail and the launch point tent!

What’s the scoop with the University of Maryland launch point?

Precise address: Paint Branch Drive and Technology Drive, College Park MD 20742

Closest Metro: College Park – U of Md.

What’s the scoop with the 11th St bridge launch point?

Precise address: Good Hope Rd SE and Anacostia River Trail (below 11th St Bridge)

Closest Metro: Anacostia

Arriving by bike: if you are arriving from the east bank, the most pleasant connections to the trail and over/under 295 and Minnesota Ave are Good Hope Rd SE, and River Terrace though Nicholson is also a decent option. If you arriving from the west bank of the Anacostia River, the most pleasant connection across the river is 11th St Bridge though Benning and South Capitol are also decent options.

Arriving by car: Parking is free at the Anacostia Metro garage over the weekends. There is also plenty of free parking along Anacostia Ave in the park, and paralleling the trail.

Anything else I should know? To get from the Metro, follow the signs to the parking garage. Once at the parking garage, walk out the back and across Howard Rd to the gate of the fence. You’ll see a 1 story National Park Service building and the blue roof of the Park Police headquarters behind it. Walk straight through (the public is allowed!) and straight to the river. Once you arrive at the trail, take a right and we’ll be at the bridge you can see!

How do I join?

Come to the river on September 29th!

Let us know you’re coming!

Quick Tips: Riding in the Rain

Whether you get caught in a sudden downpour or you put on your waterproof gear with a smile, eventually we all end up riding in the rain. It’s not all bad, a pleasant summer shower can be quite refreshing after all, but a few practical riding tips will make sure that you end up at your destination damp but happy.

Ride Safe

If you’ve driven a car in the rain, you know that the roads are very different when they’re wet, and with bicycles, the situation is pretty similar. Here’s what to do when you’re riding in the rain:

  • Go slow – Wet tires + wet pavement + wet brakes = much less stopping power. The slower you’re moving, the faster you’ll stop when you have to.
  • Feather your brakes – When you know you’ll be stopping soon (at all red lights and stop signs, of course), take a moment to tap your brakes lightly a few times to dry off the surface of your brake pads.
  • Light it up – Visibility is reduced in the rain, so use extra lights, reflective material and bright clothing. Cars can only avoid you if they can see you.
  • Take the lane – When you control the lane, you make sure that you are visible and like we just said, visibility should be one of your priorities.
  • Traction control – Road paint and metal are very slippery when wet, so try to keep clear of manhole covers, grates and crosswalk paint, especially while braking and/or turning.
  • Wait it out – If you’re at all unsure of riding in the rain, find a cozy cafe somewhere and wait it out. You can always put your bike on the bus or metro, too. (See Metro’s rules about bikes here)
  • Be prepared – A small investment in the right gear now can save you some rain-soaked misery later. Check out the gear tips below.
  • Don’t ride through floods – You never know what’s under standing water—dangerous currents, potholes, sinkholes, broken glass, loch ness monsters. If the road or trail you’re on is flooded, find another way around.

Gearing up

First, of all, whenever you suspect that your future may be wet, pack along a good waterproof rain shell just in case.

Next, think about investing in a set of fenders. Not only will the rear fender prevent the dreaded “skunk stripe” of dirty water up your back, but the front fender will help keep your shoes dry.  Which brings us to…

Waterproof cycling shoes exist, but for most people who don’t ride in the rain regularly, they’re on the expensive side. Biking in regular rain boots or waterproof hiking boots is a good option if it’s cold out. If it’s warm, consider just letting your feet get wet—pack some light shoes and dry socks and change when you arrive. Sandals can be a good option too – your feet are already waterproof.

Tip-within-a-tip: After you remove those wet shoes, stuff them with crumpled up newspaper and stick ’em near a radiator. By the time the workday is over, the newspaper will have sucked the moisture out of them and they’ll be dry and ready to get soaked all over again.

With a little bit of thought and preparation, riding in the rain can actually be fun! Enjoy the ride out there.

Visualize 2045 should envision a more bike-friendly future.

On a map, our bike network is pretty wide, but not totally connected. We want to challenge the Transportation Planning Board to think bigger for Visualize 2045.

Imagine our region in the year 2045. What will transportation look like in this region for people who bike and walk? What types of infrastructure will we have?

WABA has spent a lot of time thinking about this. Our vision is one including hundreds of paved trails, interconnected networks of protected bike lanes, and safe and accessible places to bike for transportation, recreation and fitness.

Regional transportation planners are also asking this same question for all modes of transportation. Through the Transportation Planning Board (TPB, the Washington DC’s federally designated metropolitan planning organization), regional planners have created Visualize 2045, a long-range transportation plan.

The intent of this long-range plan is to chart the course for the next 25+ years, and include aspirational elements that will help push our region in the right direction.

While there are some positive elements within Visualize 2045, the plan doesn’t go nearly far enough for people who bike and walk.

Of the seven aspirational elements, only two directly address biking and walking. In addition, the trail initiative, known as the National Capital Trail, is just a small sliver of a much broader, visionary future trail network called the Capital Trails Network.

Submit feedback to Visualize 2045

The network has been researched, defined, and mapped by a coalition of public agencies representing TPB member jurisdictions, non-profit organizations, and other stakeholders focused on completing the Washington DC regional trail network.

The TPB needs to fully adopt the Capital Trails Network as a key part of the long-range transportation plan, and invest in trails and bicycling and walking projects.

If our Transportation Planning Board refuses to be bold, to think big, and to develop new transportation solutions, then we will be stuck with the same transportation problems (congestion and traffic fatalities to name a few).

Submit feedback to Visualize 2045

Tell the Transportation Planning Board that you want a brighter future for biking in the region! Let them know that the entire Capital Trails Network should be adopted in the long-range plan, and that more extensive planning should be done for our future regional bike networks.

Where’s WABA?: September Edition

Have a trail or bike question? You’re in luck because it’s September – which means all the street festivals happen and WABA has a busy schedule planned! We’ll have trivia, oodles of really great bike maps and lots of thoughts on getting around our region.

Find us at:

Park(ing) Day
Friday September 21st, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm
2101 Martin Luther King Jr Ave SE, Washington DC

Hillcrest Community Day
Saturday September 22nd, 11:00 am – 3:00 pm
3100 Denver St SE, Washington DC

DC State Fair
Sunday September 23rd, 11:00 am – 8:00 pm
4th and M St SW, DC

H St Festival
Saturday October 13th, 12:00 pm – 7:00 pm
~600 H St NE, Washington DC

Want to help us spread bike love and talk your socks off? Volunteer as part of our outreach team.

We’re Hiring: DC Bike Ambassador (Part-Time)

The Washington Area Bicyclist Association is looking for an outgoing, energetic, and motivated person to help run the D.C. Bike Ambassador program. The program’s goal is to establish WABA’s presence city-wide, to foster a positive impression of bicycling and bicyclists and to educate residents and local organizations about bike laws, roadway safety, and potential benefits of bicycling to individuals, families, workplaces, and communities.

The D.C. Bike Ambassador will promote WABA’s programs and the Bike Ambassadors’ core messaging, as well as coordinate volunteer Bike Ambassador outreach events, and help recruit local residents to become volunteer Ambassadors and attend WABA classes, programs, and events.

This position is part-time, 20 hours per week and compensation is $15 per hour.

Responsibilities

  • Implement Bike Ambassador outreach, education, encouragement, and community organizing events for WABA.
  • Recruit and energize our team of volunteer D.C. Bike Ambassadors.
  • Distribute print resources to community members, such as D.C. bike maps, Quick Start Guides, D.C. Pocket Law Guides, Capital Bikeshare information, and WABA education and promotional materials.
  • Pull the WABA Bike Ambassador billboard bike trailer (up to 20 miles/week).
  • Complete administrative and reporting requirements.
  • Report to, communicate and coordinate regularly and effectively with supervisor about goals, planning and logistics, reporting, challenges and issues.
  • Other WABA duties as assigned.

Preferred Qualifications

The ideal candidate will have:

  • A strong commitment to WABA’s mission.
  • Willingness and excitement to learn bicycling safety, traffic law, skills, and WABA’s bike encouragement philosophy.
  • Experience planning events and coordinating volunteers.
  • Excellent presentation and public speaking skills.
  • A flexible schedule and willingness to work evenings, and weekends.
  • Experience with Microsoft Office, Google Apps (Gmail, Calendar, Drive/Docs/Sheets, Forms), Facebook and Twitter.
  • The ability to pull a bicycle trailer weighing 10 lbs. for 1-3 hours.
  • The ability to lift at least 40 lbs.
  • Organized, good time management skills and ability to multitask in a relaxed, fun environment.
  • Conversational fluency in Spanish (strongly preferred).
  • Familiarity with American Sign Language (ASL) a plus.
  • League of American Cycling Instructor (LCI) certification a plus.

About the Washington Area Bicyclist Association

Making bicycling better through advocacy and education, the Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) promotes biking as a healthy, low-cost, and environmentally-friendly form of transportation and recreation. With 6,500 members region-wide, WABA serves the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area, including the District of Columbia and communities in Maryland and Virginia.

To Apply

Send a cover letter and resume to jobs@waba.org with “Bike Ambassador.” Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis; the position will remain open until filled. Interested candidates are encouraged to apply by or before Friday, September 22nd, 2018. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted. No phone calls please.

WABA is committed to providing equal employment opportunity for all persons regardless of race, color, religion, national origin, marital status, arrest record or criminal convictions, political affiliation, sexual orientation or gender identity, disability, sex, or age.

Is the WB&A Trail along MD 704 feasible? Study says YES

A critical gap in the region’s trail network is closer to completion! Prince George’s County took a big step forward on the WB&A (Washington Baltimore & Annapolis) Trail by publishing a feasibility study of a trail extension along Martin Luther King Jr. Highway (also known as MD-704) to connect the existing WB&A Trail to DC.

Rendering courtesy of Wallace Montgomery and Prince George’s County.

A 12-mile rail-trail in Prince George’s and Anne Arundel Counties, the WB&A Trail is already one of the region’s great recreation and transportation trails. Along the tree-lined route, the trail rises over and tunnels under major highways, connecting neighborhoods, parks, schools and jobs.

But the trail is far from complete.

The trail ends miles from DC’s northeast border and remains isolated from the rest of the DC trail network. Extending the trail to DC would fill a substantial gap in the regional trail network (in fact, the trail would go all the way across Prince George’s County!), creating safe walking and biking options for the communities along the corridor. That’s one reason why the trail has been at or near the top of the Prince George’s County’s Bicycle and Pedestrian transportation funding priorities since 2011!

The WB&A Trail was converted from an old railroad. Unfortunately, planners didn’t make the entire rail corridor into a trail—some was converted into a highway. That highway is Martin Luther King Jr. Highway (MLK Highway), a straight shot from the trail’s southern terminus to the DC line.

WB&A in Green, trail extension in Red

MLK Highway was built to move cars quickly, making the corridor a hostile place for people biking and walking. Despite close proximity to neighborhoods, schools, parks and stores, sidewalks are missing on more than half of the 6.5 mile corridor. Wide intersections make safely crossing the street challenging even where crosswalks and traffic lights are present. It’s a stressful place to bike and walk, so few people do it.

MLK Highway is a 6-8 lane speedway. Building a trail alongside it would make it accessible to people outside of cars.

That’s exactly why WABA, together with Prince George’s County, Oxon Hill Bike and Trail Club, the Capital Trails Coalition and many others are working to change MLK Highway. This major highway is the only connection between dozens of communities, and we strongly believe it should be a safe place to bike and walk.

With a new multi-use trail, MLK Highway could transform from a barrier that separates communities into a safe, inviting corridor that unifies them with new options for getting around.

And the neighbors would benefit tremendously from a safe place to bike and walk along MLK Highway! The corridor has 16 parks and recreation centers, five schools, two libraries, and over 30 places of worship all within a half mile of MLK Highway.

WABA has been with this project from day one. We’ve been leading rides on the trail and on MLK Highway, meeting with elected officials along the corridor, supporting the planning department, researching the economic effects of extending the trail, and organizing trail advocates across the county.

A WABA-led ride on the WB&A! Here we are at Mile 0.

The feasibility study identified places along the corridor that have plenty of room for a multi-use trail, and other areas that are more challenging (based on physical and engineering constraints). The study gives us solid footing, and helps all partners understand what the hurdles will be as the vision for this trail and a path towards completion takes shape.

And we’ll continue to be involved, because closing this gap in the trail network is critical to WABA’s mission. A feasibility study is a significant milestone, but we’ve got lots of work to do before we’re safely riding a completed WB&A Trail.

Want to get involved in this project?

Join neighbors and advocates to build momentum and support for a new 704 trail. Sign up below!

I want to support the WB&A!




August Advocacy Roundup

What a summer this has been for the region’s bicyclists!

This roundup would be incomplete if we didn’t mention the fact that the District’s commitment to zeroing out traffic fatalities, known as Vision Zero, has gone pretty poorly. Unfortunately, we lost two of our own—Malik Habib and Jeffrey Hammond Long—far too early. To prevent this from happening again, together, we’re going to keep fighting for more devoted bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure, better laws to protect us all, and so much more.

That said, I want to be clear that your work has made all the difference. By showing up for bicyclists—at rallies, online, petitioning, action committee meetings—we are turning the tide in the city. This summer was one of our most productive to date, with big wins throughout the region. But we still have a long way to go before we can rest.

If you’re reading this and haven’t come out to a training, action committee or event, come on out! We don’t bite! We’d love to hear from you. We have a lot planned for Fall and Winter 2018 so there are a ton of different ways to get involved!


“Enough is enough.”

Cyrus Habib and Laura Montiel, the brother and mother of Malik Habib, speak at the Vision Zero Rally last month.

Following the deaths of two cyclists on D.C. streets, more than 120 of us rallied on Freedom Plaza to let Mayor Bowser know that enough is enough. We deserve safer streets for all road users. And no more lives should be lost before D.C. truly makes Vision Zero a priority.

The Capital Trails Coalition released a new map!

A vision for the regional trail network.

Earlier this month, WABA and the Capital Trails Coalition announced a new vision for transportation in the region with a brand new map! The map visualizes the region’s Capital Trails Network, which currently has 436 miles of existing trails, with 206 miles of planned trails to go. Check out the map and learn about WABA’s work with the Capital Trails Coalition here.

New construction on the Metropolitan Branch Trail

It’s been a long time coming! This MBT segment, which will take about 18 months to complete, will connect Fort Totten to Brookland.

Last month, DDOT broke ground on the next phase of the Metropolitan Branch trail, which will connect Fort Totten to Brookland! Once complete, the MBT will connect Silver Spring to Union Station. Read more on the trail’s progress here.

Movement on Eastern Downtown protected bike lanes

We held an advocate training in early August in preparation for the Eastern Downtown protected bike lanes. A decision could be coming soon, and we want to be ready.

Montgomery County to adopt nation’s most comprehensive bike master plan

Montgomery County is on the cusp of adopting the most comprehensive bike master plan in the entire country. After the comment period closed on August 24th, the comments and plan will be reviewed one last time. Read more about the plan’s bold vision for Montgomery County here.

Long Bridge updates

In mid-June, DDOT noted that because of tremendous public support (from you!), a bike/ped trail will be included in alternatives moving forward on Long Bridge. And as great as that is, it’s still not quite enough. Read more about Long Bridge updates here.

A permanent, safer crossing for the Capital Crescent Trail

After Ned Gaylin was struck and killed while crossing the Capital Crescent Trail at Little Falls Parkway in 2016, Montgomery Parks moved swiftly to make that intersection safer. Now, the county is looking for feedback from the community on how to make the intersection safer, permanently. Read more here.

A new team focusing on Ward 8 bicycle infrastructure!

I think everyone knows about the hills East of the Anacostia River. Or maybe you’ve ridden to Oxon Cove or the Riverwalk Trail. However, on-street bicycle infrastructure to Ward 8 is almost non-existent. That’s dangerous. With our organizer, Hannah Neagle, we’ve launched a group that meets to discuss problem intersections, poorly designed roadways and other bicycle and pedestrian challenges. Email Hannah to learn more!


Are you on your local WABA Action Committee?

All across the region great people are working to fix our streets to make biking safe and popular. They meet each month to share ideas and work together for better places to bike. Whether you’re looking for a fun group, a new cause, or a wonky policy discussion, our Action Committees have it covered.

See what we’re doing in your community and join us for the next meeting.


WABA in the News:

REI Tops $1 Million to ‘Rewild’ 5 Major US Cities – Gear Junkie, June, 25, 2018

Cyclist in Bike Lane Killed in Downtown DC Crash – NBC4, July 10, 2018

A cyclist’s death, a dangerous crossing, a D.C.’s struggle to reduce road fatalities – The Washington Post, July 14, 2018

Bike And Pedestrian Advocates Plan To Protest D.C.’s Failure To Prevent Road Deaths – DCist, July 18, 2018.

Forget Vision Zero. Demand Streets That Don’t Kill People – Treehugger, July 18, 2018

‘We are just vulnerable’: Cyclist demand DC prioritize road safety after 2 deaths – WTOP, July 19, 2018

‘Dear DDOT’: We want 20,000 dockless bikes – The Washington Post, July 30, 2018

Dockless bike companies Ofo, Mobike, pull out of DC, but others remain – WTOP, August 1, 2018

Bike Advocates Draft New Map of DC Region’s Cycling Trails to Promote Holistic Thinking – ARLnow.com, August 13, 2018

Under rules of the road, it’s car vs. bike. Or maybe the rules make losers of both. – The Washington Post, August 14, 2018

Our streets make us unhappy. They don’t have to. – The Washington Post, August 26, 2018


P.S. Your membership dollars directly fund our advocacy work, which makes our region a better place for bicycling.

Donate

600+ speak up for Louisiana Ave protected bike lanes

Louisiana Ave in red is a missing link in a much larger protected bike lane network in green

After more than three years of plans for a Louisiana Avenue protected bike lane bouncing between DDOT, the Architect of the Capitol and other Capital grounds departments, WABA started a petition in May to reinvigorate planning for the project. The petition called on US Senate Sergeant at Arms Michael Stenger, one of the many stakeholders for the Capitol grounds, to work proactively to implement this project without further delay. When we delivered the petition earlier this month, 610 people had signed on!

The Louisiana Ave protected bike lane project is a key connector for downtown DC’s low-stress, protected bicycle network. DDOT’s concepts envision a continuous protected bike lane connecting the Pennsylvania Ave lanes to First St. NE via Constitution Ave and Louisiana Ave. It would link the Metropolitan Branch Trail to the National Mall, filling a key gap in the Capital Trails Network and the East Coast Greenway. It would be a tremendous improvement for thousands of daily bike commuters, Capital staff, and visitors.

Though Louisiana Ave is a relatively short road, making changes to it is complicated due to an intricate web of overlapping ownership and interest. The Architect of the Capitol, National Park Service, Senate Sergeant at Arms, the District government, Congress and more all have a say in what happens in this space. The good news is that the key stakeholders, including the Sergeant at Arms, Architect of the Capitol, DDOT and Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton are now all at the table talking through a path forward. And while there is nothing concrete to report today, we hope to share some news soon.

You can read our letter to the Sergeant at Arms here.

The Capital Trails Coalition’s new trail network map!

Our region is well-known for our complex transportation systems for cars, trains, and Metro Rail, but what about our biking and walking infrastructure?

What if there was a superhighway system for bicyclists and walkers, where you could start on one side of the region and end up on the other side of the region, without having to mix with drivers?

Shouldn’t we think as big about bike infrastructure as we do about massive interstate systems for motorized vehicles?

The answer is YES. That’s exactly why WABA and the Capital Trails Coalition are proud to announce a new vision for transportation in the region. We’re working to complete the region’s paved trail network, and today, we’re launching a map that articulates our bold vision for trails in the DC region.

The new Capital Trails Network map.

Currently, the region has 436 miles of existing trails, with 302 miles of planned trails to go. The planned trails will close gaps in the regional trail network and connect smaller trails to high-capacity and well-loved trails, like the Metropolitan Branch Trail, Mount Vernon Trail, and Anacostia River Trail.

Show your support for a regional trail network!

With the support of REI, WABA has spent the past three years building and managing the Capital Trails Coalition, a collaboration between public agencies, nonprofit organizations, business improvement districts and other groups. The Coalition is working toward a world-class trail network that prioritizes connectivity for people who walk and bike.

But the completion of this trail network is not going to magically happen. We need everyone—whether you commute via trail everyday or live far from a trail but wish you had one nearby—to speak up for this network and help us get it done.

Show your support for a regional trail network!

We know that people in the DC region love trails and want more of them. From Arlington County to Prince George’s County, “more trails!” is the rallying cry from nearly every survey on public amenities.

That’s why we need your voice. We need to cultivate widespread consensus that this trail network is a regional priority!

Sign up here to show your support and get updates on the progress of the Capital Trails Coalition.