World Day of Remembrance 2018: “Gone, but Never Forgotten”

On Sunday, November 18th, WABA hosted the World Day of Remembrance in DC.

As the waning sun dropped below the horizon, and the falling autumn leaves signaled that a cool breeze and cooler temps were ahead, nearly a dozen riders arrived at Douglas Memorial United Methodist Church to join other community members in solidarity for World Day of Remembrance for Victims of Traffic Violence.

For the first time, WABA had the pleasure of partnering with six local congregations around DC to make World Day of Remembrance happen in a substantive and meaningful way. Earlier in the day, congregations offered sermons, prayers and reflections around the idea of safe streets. The evening gathering was a heartfelt display of community, care and compassion for those lives lost to traffic crashes.

Standing outside of Douglas Memorial Church, participants huddled together as the World Day of Remembrance projection shown on the wall for all to see. WABA’s Executive Director, Greg Billing, read the names of the 31 friends, family and community members lost this year because of traffic related crashes. Many of the victims were the drivers of motor vehicles, while others were people we had known, had ridden with and worked alongside here at WABA.

As the names were read, several passer-bys stopped to pay their respects. There were words of comfort offered by the pastors of Douglass Memorial and Mount Vernon United Methodist Churches. A song soothed our sorrows and a spoken word was delivered that moved many to tears. All in all, it was what we all needed from that space in that time. To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven. Now we must continue in the work of doing all possible to ensure that ZERO lives are lost due to traffic crashes in 2019.

Take the Vision Zero Pledge

To all the participants throughout Washington DC and the region: thank you for supporting WABA and World Day of Remembrance. Without you, it would be impossible for WABA to continue doing the work of making bicycling better for everyone in the region. Your support helps us advocate for better laws and more bicycle friendly traffic lanes.

See the gallery for photos from this year’s World Day of Remembrance gathering in D.C.

Connecting Virginia and DC via the Long Bridge

2018 has been quite the year for mobility in the region. We’ve seen some highs and some lows — the rise of scooters and e-bikes (CaBi plus is fire…) has been pretty great for the region. For lows, well…Vision Zero hasn’t exactly gone super well and, of course, the all too frequent Metro shutdowns have really not been good.

And yeah, there are too many cars doing terrible things. Like killing and maiming people.

But, sneaking in during the last month is some surprising and absolutely necessary news — we are going to get a dedicated bike and pedestrian bridge from Long Bridge Park in Arlington east to DC.

Make no mistake, the Long Bridge Project represents a once in a generation opportunity to transform our regional transportation network by adding freight and passenger rail capacity, connecting major regional bicycle and pedestrian trails and providing new, direct links to two of the fastest growing areas of our region.

Regional density is increasing and roads are becoming more crowded. Demand for non-motorized modes of transportation that are safe, accessible and convenient to employment hubs is on the rise, too. Long Bridge could be an answer, resulting in a better connected regional trail network.

So, what does this new crossing actually look like?

Well, we don’t know yet.

A few facts:

  • The existing Long Bridge, built in 1904, requires significant upgrades in order to meet rail capacity projected in the coming years;
  • It is significantly less expensive — both in dollars and environmentally — to keep the existing span and build another rail bridge upstream;
  • To mitigate (called 4(f) mitigation) any existing impacts to National Park Service (NPS) land, the project team will have to design and build a bike/pedestrian bridge upstream of the proposed rail bridge (in between the existing rail bridge and WMATA’s yellow line);
  • Current plans call for connecting Long Bridge Park to the south to East Potomac Park to the north — and we don’t know exactly what the connection will look like in DC;
  • We still have a long way to go until this is built (current plans are shooting for 2025) and there is no project sponsor — so, we don’t know who will own this bridge.

What will the bike/ped bridge look like?

This is the million dollar question. Currently, the bridge is slotted in between the proposed upstream rail bridge (passenger rail) and Metrorail’s Yellow Line. As you can see in the image below, we don’t have more detailed renderings (or a proper design) yet. This will be particularly important for users moving between points south and the District, as the plans don’t take people all the way to Maine Avenue (and to L’Enfant), but would drop people off just north of Ohio Drive. That’s not ideal — and will require DDOT to upgrade the existing network to safely move people over East Potomac Park into the city.

Where do we go from here?

There is a lot of work that needs to be done to get this project over the finish line. Notably, nobody really knows who will own the bridge (let alone pay for the bridge). That’s important. Bottom line: without building the next upstream bridge, there will be no bike/ped bridge. The project steps below (from DDOT’s presentation) show that until pen goes to paper in Spring 2020, this project is still in flux. So, we will have a lot of work to do to make sure that this project stays on course.

Image from Long Bridge Public Meeting on Nov. 29.

So, there you go. We have lots of meetings and conversations (with Federal Railroad Administration, CSX, VDOT and DDOT) to determine exactly what is ahead. There will be lots of opportunities for public input (especially after the draft Environmental Impact Statement happens in Summer 2019).

Stay tuned. There is so much work left to do, but right now things are looking good for those of us moving between Virginia and the District.

A realistic path to Zero.

Last week, the Mayor released a call to the community: What would you do if you weren’t afraid to fail?

We have a few thoughts.

Look, it’s no secret: DC’s commitment to Vision Zero has been an open question in 2018. With traffic fatalities up 19% this year over the same time in 2017, advocates across the city have been asking for a reinvigorated commitment from Mayor Bowser and the city government.

And the Mayor has heard us—well, kinda.

In November, Mayor Bowser unveiled a series of proposals—both procedural and substantive—designed to jumpstart Vision Zero and move towards making that vision a reality.

Though we applaud these steps as necessary, we still believe that the city has a long way to go. There are as many questions as there are answers.

So, with the Mayor’s call for big proposals ringing in our ears, we’ve been discussing what needs to be done to actually get to zero traffic fatalities in the District.

“Big ideas. Not afraid to fail….”

So, we’ve taken a hard look at the city’s commitments, what works, what hasn’t…and what do we actually need. Not what is politically feasible, but what do we need?

To that end, we’d like to offer a series of policy recommendations to transform DC’s transportation system for the 21st century.

read the report

Some recommendations have been taken on board by the city, and some we hope that they will look at in 2019. Transitioning the District of Columbia’s transportation system to be safer, more equitable and sustainable demands overarching and comprehensive strategy—we think we’ve captured the beginnings of exactly what that will take.

Since the Mayor asked, we’ve decided to give it a go.

We hope you’ll take some time to head to https://www.dc2me.com/ and tell the Mayor all about your own big ideas for transformational change in the region.

Montgomery County has a new Bike Plan and it’s a big deal!

Last week, the Montgomery County Council voted unanimously to adopt a new Bicycle Master Plan for the County. This vote is the culmination of more than three years of intensive analysis, public engagement, and advocacy. By adopting this plan, the Council endorsed a dramatic shift in the County’s goals and approach to growing bicycling, committing MoCo to a convenient, inclusive, and low-stress bicycling future!

While its broad strokes are similar to bicycle plans from neighboring cities and counties, the new Montgomery County Bicycle Master Plan is in a league of its own due to its analytical rigor, its commitment to promoting bicycling for people of all ages and skill levels, and its ambitious countywide vision. The plan aims to make bicycling a convenient, safe and popular option in every community, a strong complement to transit, and a joyful part of everyday life.

To achieve its goals, the plan is packed with network maps of new bicycle infrastructure, new bicycle-friendly policies and programs, and so much more. Here are some of the highlights. It calls for:

  • an impressive, 1,000+ mile, low-stress bicycle network of new protected bike lanes, trails, and quiet neighborhood streets, which will comfortably connect bicyclists of all ages and abilities to the places they need to go;
  • new low-stress bikeways concentrated around urban areas, transit stops, schools, libraries, and county services so that a bicycle is the first choice for short trips;
  • a network of high-capacity “Breezeways” between major destinations that allows people on bikes to cross longer distances with fewer delays, where all users – including slower moving bicyclists and pedestrians – can safely and comfortably travel together;
  • new design guidelines for high quality, safe, and accessible protected bike lanes, trails and intersections;
  • new programs and staff positions to build out the network, support people who bike and encourage more people to give it a try;
  • abundant and secure, long-term bicycle parking facilities near Metro, Purple Line, Bus Rapid Transit, and MARC stations;
  • and rigorous metrics to evaluate the county’s progress in carrying out the plan.

Data under the hood

Woven throughout the plan is a deep, research-backed understanding of what keeps people from biking. More than 50% of people are interested in biking for transportation and recreation but don’t because they are concerned about their safety. So, the plan puts a focus on creating interconnected, low-stress bicycling networks that appeal to everyone, not just the people biking today.

Top: A stress map of downtown Bethesda (low-stress in blue, higher stress in yellow, orange and red). Bottom: Recommended improvements for a low-stress downtown Bethesda (trails green, separated bikeways orange, bike lanes blue, shared streets red).

Months of painstaking analysis of bicycle level of stress showed that the majority of streets and neighborhoods in Montgomery County are already perfect for bicycling. But major roads, urban areas, and short stress points severely limit the reach of people who have no interest in the stresses of biking in car traffic. Adding protected bike lanes, trails, and other bikeways to those stressful roads unlocks new areas in the map of bikeable destinations. And with impressive analytical tools in hand, we know which changes to road design will create the biggest gains for safe, convenient, and low-stress bicycling connections.

Thanks to all who made this possible

Drafting, debating, and polishing this plan took incredible effort and dedication from county planning staff, residents and elected officials over the past three years. Hundreds of neighborhood advocates showed up to share their ideas and dreams at dozens of public meetings, workshops, rides, and hearings and submitted thousands of comments online. An advisory group of twenty volunteers stayed deeply involved at every stage through monthly meetings. The Planning Board and County Council weighed public input through months of detailed discussions.

Through it all, planning staff were persistent in defending the high standards and bold vision residents asked for.

Thank you to everyone who put their time, thoughts and effort into bringing the Montgomery County Bicycle Master Plan to a star finish!

What’s next?

Adopting the plan is a momentous milestone. Now the work begins to implement its vision. Some of the plan’s recommendations can get started immediately: creating an interagency implementation task force, updating policies, and refocusing existing work. But the majority of the big changes called for will require a significant expansion in funding for planning, engineering, and construction, new staff and resources over the next twenty years. Most improvements will be made by the Montgomery County Department of Transportation though routine road resurfacing or more substantial rebuilding projects. Others will be made in partnership with State agencies or private developers.

Just as important as the funding, transforming colored lines on a map into new, great places to bike will take persistent involvement from advocates, buy-in from county staff, and leadership from county elected officials. But with every step, more places will be just a convenient bike ride away, and bicycling will slowly become a perfectly normal way to get around and an inseparable part of daily life in Montgomery County.

Learn more

You can learn see the final draft of the Bicycle Master Plan here (will be updated soon with the final revisions), review the County Council’s final changes here, and see the complete network in this interactive map.

First spreadsheets, then shovels

Whether it’s organizing for better places to bike, learning to ride, finding a supportive peer group, building skills for riding in the city, commuting for the first time, or finishing the 50 States Ride for the tenth time, WABA is a community of people helping each other accomplish big things.

Today, we’re asking for your help. Will you make a donation to WABA today?

Enjoying a pop-up protected bike lane in Bethesda. We can’t wait for the permanent one! Photo: Bethesda BIKE Now.

Anna Irwin is one of the thousands of you who accomplished something really big this year. Here’s what happened:

When Anna and her husband moved from DC to Bethesda ten years ago, she wanted two things: trail access and good public transportation options. And for a few years, she had them. Her commute was downright dreamy: a ride down the tree-covered Capital Crescent Trail onto DC’s network of protected bike lanes.

Then, on her daughter’s first day of school, everything changed. Their connection to school and work, the Georgetown Branch Trail, closed to make way for the construction of the Purple Line, a new light rail line.

Anna felt trapped. She rode the official detour and found herself navigating a poorly signed route on crowded sidewalks, through bike lanes filled with trucks and parked cars, and over roads torn up for construction or closed altogether.

Instead of resigning herself to five or more years of frustrating mornings and dangerous afternoons, Anna stepped up. Within a week, she checked in with her neighbors struggling with the same lack of transportation choices, started documenting her rides, and wrote her first letter to everyone she could think of—including WABA.

”When I started, I wasn’t sure who had the power to make the changes we needed. WABA was one of my first allies—and they connected me to others. It turns out that lots of people in the county government get it—and the team at WABA is on a first name basis with most of them. They know that biking is a critical component of the transportation mix in our future. And they want to build the same safe, protected, and connected networks that I do. What they need is to hear from the community. So, I pulled my community together, and we showed up.”

Anna didn’t just show up, though. When the county held a meeting about the closure of the Georgetown Branch Trail, Anna showed up with a hundred WABA members, a marker-drawn map of solutions, and a digital community calling for change.

A few packed public meetings, a thousand petition signatures, and one last-minute budget resolution later, and—fingers crossed—we’ll see shovels in the ground for a new network of protected bike lanes through Bethesda in 2019.

We can’t wait to take a low-stress ride with Anna and her daughter (hopefully you’ll come, too!). In the meantime, WABA’s advocacy team will be up to their elbows in engineering blueprints, county budget spreadsheets, and site visits to make sure that the county does it right.

WABA is in it for the long haul in Montgomery County and everywhere across the region. But we need you to show up today so WABA can be with you and your community tomorrow and for years to come.

donate today

The Best Way Across the Potomac Isn’t Built Yet (But It Could Be)

Recent construction on bridges over the Potomac has been a bit of a disaster for bicyclists. In a sense, the existing inadequacies of Potomac River crossings (trails dead ending, narrow sidewalks, dangerous fencing, and more) have been exacerbated by the construction highlighting a need for more, high-quality Potomac River crossings to be connected to both the Virginia and District’s bike networks.

But that might change.

We have an opportunity to build the finest Potomac River trail crossing in an unlikely place—the Long Bridge.

Wait…what is the Long Bridge?

The Long Bridge is the the rusting hulk of a rail bridge that you can see heading over the Potomac River on Metro or from the Mount Vernon Trail. Currently, it is a two-track railway bridge that serves freight, commuter trains and Amtrak.

However, this bridge needs some improvements. Built in 1904, the bridge has outlived its usefulness and needs some serious improvements to meet the needs of our growing region.

DDOT, VDOT, CSX, the Federal Railroad Administration (and more) are working on a series of potential redesign options. Though the scope of the project is focused on increasing rail capacity, included in those redesigns are two bicycle/pedestrian options—one option is for a bike/ped bridge that is connected to the rail bridge and the other option is a free-standing bridge that runs parallel to the bridge. However, DDOT is only considering these options. These options are not guaranteed and we have already heard some grumbling about cost and security for a bicycle/pedestrian crossing.

“Build the Long Bridge for people.” Has a nice ring to it, no?

Though we don’t have much more clarity on those options, what we do know is that this is a once in a lifetime opportunity to build what could be the safest, highest quality Potomac River bicycle and pedestrian crossing on the day it opens.

So WABA—along with fourteen (14) partner organizations—called for the project team to include a bicycle and pedestrian trail to be constructed concurrently with the rail component. You can find our letter here.

The letter itself lays out five principles for designing the project:

  1. Include a bicycle and pedestrian trail across the Potomac River.
  2. This bicycle and pedestrian trail should be funded and constructed concurrently with the rail component of the Long Bridge project.
  3. The bicycle and pedestrian trail should be incorporated into the design of the broader project in a way that optimizes the achievability of the project with regard to cost and complexity.
  4. The bicycle and pedestrian trail should be designed to enhance the connectivity of the regional trail network. Specifically, the trail should connect to the esplanade in Long Bridge Park in Arlington. In the District, the trail should extend as far towards L’Enfant Plaza as physically possible to maximize connectivity to existing trails.
  5. The bicycle and pedestrian trail should be designed and constructed to the highest design standards, with a minimum width of 12 feet wide, and seamless connections to existing trail networks.

To be clear, this project is a long way from being built. And we’ve got a lot of work to do to make sure that the bridge includes a bike/ped trail. That’s why we want you to show up to the next public meeting on November 29th to speak up for Long Bridge.

Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs Building
1100 4th St SW (Room E200)
Washington, DC 20024
4pm – 7pm (presentations will be at 4:30pm and 6pm)

Let us know if you’re coming

You can find out more about the project at the project webpage here or on the WABA blog. At the meeting, DDOT will show us their proposed alternative.

The benefits to having a pedestrian and bicycle trail across the Potomac along with the rail component are clear for the region. In addition to connecting the Mount Vernon Trail to East Potomac Park (and providing bicyclists and pedestrians a safe crossing along the Potomac), there are very real economic and transportation benefits to this project. That’s why we’ve got to show up and work to make this happen.

Putting our money where our mouth is

A message presented in partnership with our Corporate Partner, and 2018 50 States Ride title sponsor, Signal Financial:

A nonprofit is more than its work: as an employer and a participant in our region’s economy, we have the power to ensure our values and vision are reflected in our business practices and in the way we steward the investments WABA members and donors make in our organization.

WABA’s vision of a connected region goes beyond the protected network of trails and bike lanes we advocate for—we seek a community connected to personal and environmental health, transportation access, economic opportunity, and mobility.

That’s why we’re excited to announce that WABA moved its primary bank accounts from Wells Fargo and now banks exclusively with Signal Financial Federal Credit Union. Signal Financial is a member-based and volunteer-founded organization that directly invests in its community and shares a regional footprint with WABA.

Beyond shared values and an effective partnership, Signal Financial and WABA share members. WABA members are eligible to join the credit union, and anyone interested in banking with Signal Financial will have their first year of WABA dues paid by the credit union. And to walk the walk on those shared values, Signal Financial will donate $50 to WABA for every new Signal membership opened by a WABA supporter between now and December 31st.

Here’s to building community, one bicyclist and one business decision at a time.

Find the press release here.

End of Year Report: A Trail Ranger Sort of Season

The DC Trail Ranger seasonal program champions the trails and trail users of the District of Columbia. During the 2018 season, Tim, Carly, Trey, and Matthew kept District trails clear, led events and rides to introduce the trails to more people, and fixed a flat or three to keep trail users rolling.

Trail Rangers helped Red Line commuters try the Metropolitan Branch Trail during the August Metrorail shutdown around Brookland, partnered with the National Park Service for the centennial of Anacostia Park with a guided history tour, and had 250 people join Anacostia Pedal Paddle Palooza to explore the Anacostia watershed. It was a busy summer on the trails! Thank you for joining us.

By the numbers: in 2018, DC Trails Rangers:

  • Rode 1,978 miles on four urban trails
  • Promoted trails through 147 hours of outreach
  • Spent 195 hours cleaning broken class, clearing branches, and keeping the trail tidy for users
  • Spoke with 2,058 people about regional trails and WABA programming
  • Distributed 864 DC bike maps
  • Celebrated trails with 691 people at 19 events

Interested in being a trail ranger? Sign up to hear about future job openings! Yes!




Cider Ride: Best. Day. Ever.

On Saturday, November 3rd, WABA hosted the Cider Ride!

The rain stopped and sunny, blue skies opened up just in time for hundreds of riders join us in a celebration of fall! Riders chose one of three routes, all of them showcasing our region’s incredible multi-use trails, colorful fall foliage, and delicious cider and pie along the way.

Fall foliage on the trails makes us this happy, too.

Many riders took the chance to advocate for more trails; we worked with local businesses in Hyattsville to host a pop-up pit stop at a gap in the Hyattsville Trolley Trail. Along with sampling the offerings of several nearby businesses, riders wrote postcards to Maryland state officials to ask for quality trail design and accelerated construction of the trail extension, which would fill a critical gap in the regional trail network. Click here to sign up for future updates on the Trolley Trail.

Get updates on the Trolley Trail

Afterwards, participants celebrated the beautiful ride, ate more pie, and drank another cup of steaming cider at Dew Drop Inn. Biking, advocacy, treats, and friends—it can’t get any better!

Riders at Dew Drop Inn, enjoying donuts and the snazzy Cider Ride mugs!

To all the riders: thank you for supporting WABA! Like all signature rides, the proceeds from Cider Ride directly fund the hard work that WABA is doing to make bicycling better for everyone in the region. Your support helps us advocate for better trails and more bike lanes. Thank you.

If you want to get more involved with WABA, sign up for our advocacy alerts, join us for a City Cycling class, or volunteer at an event. Otherwise, we’ll see you at the Holiday Party in December.

We’ve collected some photos from the ride below, but, first, a final shoutout to our sponsors:

 

Celebration Sponsor:

And for additional support from:

Enjoy the photo gallery from this year’s Cider Ride!

 

Push for changes to a Capital Crescent Trail intersection where a cyclist died

Guest post by Ross Filice

photo by Erica Flock

Two years ago, a cyclist was tragically struck and killed by a driver at the intersection of the Capital Crescent Trail (CCT) and Little Falls Parkway. After this incident, the local parks service reduced car lanes to one each way and lowered the speed limit. It has worked incredibly well, and Montgomery County should make the changes permanent.

Since these changes were introduced, there has been a 67% reduction in crashes without any fatalities. Traffic has only decreased here by 3%, and drivers have only had to wait for an additional seven seconds on average. The response is well-aligned with the county’s Vision Zero commitment and its Two-Year Action Plan to have zero road deaths and serious injuries by 2030.

Current temporary road diet at the intersection. Center lanes are travel lanes while outer lanes are blocked by temporary flexible bollards. Image created with Google Maps.

In June, 2018, the Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission (M-NCPPC) Parks Service presented a large range of possible permanent alternatives for this trail crossing. Based on data assessment, modeling, and public input, they have narrowed these down to three preferred alternatives which were presented at a public meeting on October 9, 2018. The goal is to eventually present a single preferred alternative to the Montgomery County Planning Board over the coming winter.

Here’s an overview of the three options.

Alternative A:

This plan will continue the current road diet but add beautification and design improvements. It would improve lighting, return excess pavement to grass and landscaping, and implement safer and more welcoming pedestrian trails, including a raised crosswalk. This alternative is the most cost-effective (estimated $800,000), has the least environmental impact, and has proven to be safe over the last two years.

Under the current conditions, very little traffic has been diverted to nearby streets. Montgomery County Department of Transportation’s (MCDOT) plans for Arlington and Hillandale Roads will mitigate these impacts further, as will plans for the adjacent Bethesda Pool, which includes road diets and other traffic calming measures.

With this design, trail users will be safer with minimal crossing delays, and drivers will continue to only wait an average of seven extra seconds over pre-road diet conditions, with no change from the previous two years.

Preferred Alternative A: Continue the existing road diet along with beautification, improved lighting and safety, and regional safety measures such as road diets and traffic calming. Image from the M-NCPCC Project Plan Website.

Alternative B:

This plan diverts the CCT to the intersection of Arlington Road and Little Falls Parkway, and implements a three-way signal to give dedicated crossing time for vehicles (in two phases) and trail users (in one phase).

This design would keep a single travel lane in each direction to decrease vehicle speeds and improve safety. There are many complicating factors with this proposal, however. It is more expensive (estimated $1,500,000), has greater environmental impact, both trail users and drivers will have to wait longer on average (30 seconds and 13 seconds respectively), and there’s more diverted traffic is expected over current conditions (an estimated 6%).

This plan also makes it more challenging to connect the CCT to the nearby Little Falls Trail and Norwood Park, and the complex trail plan from the separate Capital Crescent Trail Connector project would likely have to be resurrected.

Most concerning, it’s likely that both drivers and trail users would be tempted to ignore the signal by either turning right on red or crossing against the signal entirely. Both actions would introduce greater risk.

Preferred Alternative B: Divert the Capital Crescent Trail to the intersection with Arlington Road and install a signalled crossing. Regional road diets and calming measures are also proposed. Image from the M-NCPCC Project Plan Website.

Alternative C:

The most expensive plan (estimated $4,000,000) but arguably the safest is to build a trail bridge over Little Falls Parkway. In this scenario, trail users and vehicles are completely separated and delays are minimized for both. However, the cost is highest, ongoing maintenance costs will likely be far greater, and the environmental impact is the greatest.

Given the minimal impact to drivers and the dramatic safety improvements demonstrated over the last two years of the temporary road diet, it seems hard to justify the financial cost and environmental impact of this solution.

Preferred Alternative C: Build a completely separated trail crossing in the form of a bridge. Regional road diets and calming measures are also proposed. Image from the M-NCPCC Project Plan Website.

The project planning team has presented an informative table comparing the three alternatives along with a default “no-build” option, which highlights many of these points. You can also see a simulated rendering of the plans, courtesy of WTOP.

Some neighbors are worried about traffic, but the data doesn’t bear that out

Feedback at the recent meeting was generally positive, but some people had concerns. Some were worried that traffic is being diverted into area neighborhoods, and others wondered how to accommodate predicted regional growth.

However, data shows that there was only a 3% decrease in traffic at the intersection during the current interim road diet, and it’s likely that even less of it was actually diverted.

No measurable increase in traffic has been observed on the nearby Dorset Avenue. The project plan has indicated that traffic may be increased on Hillandale and Arlington Roads, but both will be mitigated by parallel MC-DOT plans for road diets and other calming measures. Traffic in the adjacent Kenwood neighborhood has already been addressed by one-way streets, speed bumps, and rush hour restrictions.

Traffic from regional construction and population growth can be addressed by the incoming Purple Line, county plans for bus rapid transit, and improving trail safety as an important transportation corridor.

Tell the county to prioritize vulnerable road users’ lives

Increasing capacity for predominantly single-occupancy vehicles in the era of Vision Zero and increasingly alarming environmental reports is simply the wrong direction for the county. Ultimately, a seven-second delay is not worth returning to unsafe conditions and potentially having another person killed at this location.

This is an excellent opportunity to solidify a positive step towards embracing Vision Zero and improving safety and environmental impact for this area and the county. Alternative A is a safe, cost-effective, and minimally disruptive solution that has been proven to work well over the last two years.

Full details including plans can be viewed at the project website. Comments can be submitted by email to the project manager, Andrew Tsai and via an online public forum.

Submit Comments

This blog was cross-posted at Greater Greater Washington

Author Ross Filice lives with his family in Chevy Chase and commutes by bike to Georgetown, downtown, and several other office sites in Washington, DC. He is a strong advocate of improving bicycle and transit infrastructure throughout the Washington area.