Quick Release: WABA Blog Front Page

WABA to Host Women’s Bicycling Forum on Dec. 12th

Why aren't there more women riding in the Washington Area?

This post is part of the WABA Women Bicycling Project, an ongoing campaign to create a community, share resources and develop strategies for getting more women on bikes.  To read about the project so far, check out Quick Release, the WABA blog. To learn more and sign up to receive emails about this project, click here.

Sign up here to attend and observe the Forum. Space is limited!

Across the country, there is a significant gender gap in bicycling. Men are three times more likely to ride than women. Though this gap is smaller in the DC metro area, there are still many more men cycling in the region than women. Why is this? What causes this disparity and what can and should be done to change it?

WABA invites you to observe its first Women’s Cycling Forum on December 12th at the West End Public Library. At this roundtable discussion, a panel of women from all corners of the local bicycling arena will share their ideas and solutions as to how to increase cycling in the DC metro area.

Women on the panel include advocates, writers, city and trail professionals, activists, journalists and businesswomen. All of them are bicyclists and want to see more women on bikes.

The goal of this conversation is to produce executable recommendations that utilize WABA’s reach and resources to get more women riding more often. The event is open to the public to observe the discussion.

Event Details

When:
Monday, December 12th
6:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Where:
Large Meeting Room
DC Public Library, West End location
1101 24th St. NW

Sign up here to attend and observe the Forum. Space is limited!

Before the Event

If you would like to tell your story, you can fill out our Women’s Bicycling Forum Worksheet, and bring it with you to the Forum and your words will be included in the final project report. If you cannot attend the Forum, or would like to do things paperlessly, we have an online version of the Worksheet.

Additionally, we’ve compiled a collection of articles that have explored issues and concepts related to women and bicycling. Please feel free to pass them along to anyone else who might be interested in them:

“New Series #Girlbikegangs: How Women are Changing US Cycling”
The Bird Wheel

“Women Cycling Survey; Analysis of Results”
Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals (APBP)

“Bicycling’s Gender Gap: It’s the Economy, Stupid”
Grist

“What Women Want: A Women’s Perspective on Cycling”
Momentum Magazine

“Black Women Take Their Place in DC Bike Lanes”
The Washington Post

“Demystifying NYC’s Cycling Gender Gap”
StreetsBlog

“To Close the Gender Gap, Separate Cyclists from Cars”
StreetsBlog

“Number of Female Cyclists Lags in New York with Safety as a Concern”
New York Times

“What’s British Cycling Doing for Women?”
British Cycling

“Bike vs. Bike: Cycle Chic Debate”
Momentum Magazine

“Sex and the City – and Cycling”
Cycling Mobility

Cycling Sisters
This is a women’s cycling group whose mission is to increase the number of women who ride bicycles for transportation, and to increase the confidence and comfort of women cyclists.

“Media Articles on Women’s Cycling”
Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals (APBP)
This is a great resource with several compelling articles.

3 comments
Pamela Oguagha
Pamela Oguagha

I am very interested in attending, and will encourage my daughters to attend as well. I am interested in learning ways to exerise more and include my family in it as well.

Michael Jackson
Michael Jackson

Would be very interested in attending. As the Director of Bicycle and Pedestrian Access for the Maryland Department of Transportation I've had a strong interest in increasing the number of women and persons of color in bicycling. This discussion promises to provide additional insight or to confirm my existing understanding of barriers to bicycling that disproportionally impact women.

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  1. [...] Women’s Bicycling Forum. "Men are three times more likely to ride than women," WABA notes on its website. "Though this gap is smaller in the DC metro area, there are still many more [...]

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