It’s time for Seminary Road to go on a diet

Guest post by Jim Durham of the Alexandria Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee

Tell the city of Alexandria to stand up for safe streets!

Tell Alexandria Mayor Wilson and City Council to make sure that City staff bring the Seminary Road “road diet” to a public hearing. The safest option provides accommodations for pedestrians, bicyclists, and drivers.  The project could cut crashes in half and make this section of roadway walkable and bikeable — all for no more than a 5-second additional delay during the worst 15-minutes of rush hour traffic.

By adopting a Complete Streets Policy in 2011, the City of Alexandria directed transportation planners to design and operate the entire right of way to enable safe access for all users, regardless of age, ability, or mode of transportation. The section of Seminary Road east of Howard Street is ideally suited for the FHWA’s proven approach, a four-to-three road diet, since this section of roadway has excess capacity: motor vehicle traffic is already constrained to one lane in each direction at entrances to the project area, enabling installation of safety features such as center left-turn lanes, pedestrian refuge islands and buffer space/bike lanes without adding to congestion.

Road safety is not a popularity contest.

Transportation planners know that a properly engineered four-to-three road diet is the right solution for roads like this section of Seminary Road, but opposition to change is fierce and with high congestion in the region, some drivers are not willing to risk the possibility of even a 5-second delay in the 15-minute peak of rush-hour traffic to achieve the City’s stated safety and multi-modal objectives. Failure to bring the best option forward for a public hearing would undermine Alexandria’s commitment to Complete Streets and Vision Zero.

The Mayor has consistently referred to this project as one that requires a balanced approach. T&ES applied that “balance” by limiting consideration of the road re-configuration to the section with excess capacity. To go forward to the next phase with anything less than a properly-engineered four-to-three road diet in this section is not balanced – it is giveaway to cars at the expense of people.

The countdown to your favorite bike ride is on.

This is a guest blog post from our friends at DC Bike Ride:

We are just a few weeks away from the 2019 DC Bike Ride: your one chance to celebrate life on two wheels in a 20-mile car-free course. Come experience DC Bike Ride as we look to feature the best sights, sounds, and flavors our nation’s capital has to offer.

DC Bike Ride has a special offer for WABA supporters: $55 for 55 hours! Sign up in the next 55 hours, use the code WABA55 and get $10 off your standard registration. (Offer ends on April 17, at 10 PM EST).

Sign up!

DC Bike Ride is a fun, recreational ride, and the best opportunity to cruise through a car-free course full of flavor stations, musical acts and the beautiful views DC is known for. After the ride, we welcome everyone to the Finish Festival for free activities, fun, giveaways, and entertainment for all ages. 

The Ride is also a great way to support WABA in its efforts to collaborate with local jurisdictions on substantial street safety changes. DC Bike Ride is proud to support WABA, and since 2016 has raised over $100,000.00 for street safety programs. So sign up today, and let the fun times roll.


Arlington County’s Bike Plans Need Teeth

Arlington County is just one step away from adopting a new bicycle master plan and a new parks and trails plan for the county. Once adopted, these plans will guide the next ten to twenty-five years of bike network expansion, trail planning, and overall county policy supporting bikes as transportation, recreation, and more. On April 23rd, we have one final opportunity to suggest changes before the County Board reviews and adopts the plans.

Overall, both plans are a positive step, but we believe some important changes should be made before adoption. Read on for a summary of what is in the plans and our proposed changes and use the form below to urge the County Board to make some important changes.

Take action now:

What’s in the Bike Element?

The Bicycle Element of the Master Transportation Plan was last updated in 2008. Since then, bicycling has exploded in Arlington and best practices have evolved substantially. So, over the past two years, county staff and a group of stakeholders crafted a major update to the plan. For more on the development process and to read the final draft plan, visit the project website.

The plan is broken into a few major sections. The goals and policies section outlines broad approaches to make bicycling more accessible, popular and safe. It lays out dozens of actions to implement each policy and specific metrics to measure success. The implementation section maps the proposed bicycle network, defines thirteen Primary Bicycling Corridors, and explores the process to implement them. Finally, Appendix D lists all bicycle projects to be built by 2040.

For the most part,  The policies are excellent, detailed and worthy of praise.  They could be made even better with some tweaks, but they present an overall visionary direction for bicycling in Arlington. The implementation sections and project descriptions, however, need attention and changes.

Overall, we see three major issues:

  1. Specificity. The plans use vague terms like “enhanced bicycle facility” rather than calling for specific infrastructures, like protected bike lanes and trails. This language leaves the door open to installing subpar facilities which will not meet the plan’s goals. Specific improvements should be called out as a starting point for future planning.
  2. Prioritization. The plan needs to place low-stress bicycle networks at the top of the County’s priorities for public space. A network doesn’t work if it gets chopped into pieces to accommodate concerns about parking or trees.
  3. Funding. Without funding, this ambitious plan is just lines on paper. The County needs to commit to funding the plan.

And we are urging the following changes through specific changes in language and priorities in the plan:

  • Build a low traffic stress bicycle network
  • Reference important, new FHWA Guidance for facility selection
  • Build a solution to the Four Mile Run Trail’s Shirlington Road Crossing
  • Build a solution for the W&OD at East Falls Church
  • Build a solution for Alcova Heights
  • Provide access through nature on the Glencarlyn/hospital site
  • Connect the W&OD to Carlin Springs
  • Provide a bicycling route along the entirety of Army Navy Drive
  • Address parking in bike lanes
  • Address under- and misreporting of crashes

For the full details of our proposed changes, see our detailed comments here.

The Public Space Master Plan

This plan is a similarly ambitious document that attempts to guide the planning and management of the County’s public space system, including all of the parks, trails, natural resources and recreational facilities. It contains a chapter on trails and includes many promising additions to the County’s trail management practices and planning priorities. For more on the development process and to read the final draft plan, visit the project website.

Our suggestions for improvements highlight areas where the Public Spaces Master Plan and Bicycle Element overlap, but could be harmonized and made stronger. Specifically around land acquisition, trail design, trail maintenance, space to learn to ride bicycles, and consistent trail signage across jurisdictions. For the full details of our proposed changes, see our detailed comments here.

Ask the County Board for Changes

Use the form on this page to send a message to your County Board members. Let’s make sure that Arlington’s Master Plans are setting the County up to become a truly world-class place to bike.

On April 23rd, the Board will hold a public hearing to collect input on the plans starting at 3pm. This is an important opportunity to make sure your voice is heard. Take action using the form above and we will be in touch with details on attending the hearing.

DC’s Budget needs to reflect its values.

DC Mayor Muriel Bowser’s budget came out a few weeks ago, and it is packed with details on what the administration wants to do, including plans to spend billions of dollars on transportation over the next six years. Before we jump in, we have two overarching questions:

  1. Will this budget achieve DC’s signature transportation goal of zero traffic fatalities and serious injuries by 2024?
  2. Does it support the timely buildout of the safe, low-stress bicycle network DC needs?

While there are many great things about this budget, the answer to both of the questions above is probably not. Fortunately, there is still time to change that. The DC Council holds its DDOT budget oversight hearing on Thursday, April 11—and to get where they need to get, they need to hear from you. You can take action to tell the Council what you want to see changed in this budget.

Take Action

What’s in the Budget

The proposed 2020 Operating Budget lays out a plan for spending on staff and programs for each agency in Fiscal Year 2020 which begins in October. Also released is the Capital Improvements Program, which is a long-term plan for major construction projects and purchases from 2020 to 2025. This budget is a proposal. The DC Council may add, remove, or change it substantially.

The District Department of Transportation’s (DDOT) Capital Improvements Program includes hundreds of millions of dollars for transportation projects over the next six years. Here are some of the highlights we are excited about in the DDOT budget:

  • $63 million for safety and mobility projects including protected bike lanes, trails, bike/pedestrian planning, high crash corridors, and Vision Zero improvements;
  • $167 million for major street rebuilds including (potentially) great bike projects like C St. NE, Florida Ave NE, Connecticut Ave in Dupont, the New York Ave Trail, Dave Thomas Circle, Pennsylvania Ave west of the White House, and Broad Branch Road;
  • $10 million for 100 new Capital Bikeshare stations and 1000 bike;
  • and $110 million for new and replacement sidewalks.

While there are many laudable projects within this budget, we see too many cases where DDOT will spend tens of millions of dollars to deliver streets that are still hostile to biking and walking and dangerous by design. We are concerned that while there is a lot of money being spent to make the District’s streets safer, DDOT lacks sufficient safeguards to ensure that these expenditures are directly addressing its Vision Zero goals.

DDOT Needs a Complete Streets Policy

One of the missing safeguards is a stringent Complete Streets Policy, which would ensure that all streets are designed, operated, and maintained to accommodate safe and convenient access and mobility for all users. DDOT adopted such a policy in 2010, but it left far too many exceptions to the rule. The Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Amendment Act, adopted in 2016, required DDOT to adopt a far more stringent Complete Streets Policy by 2017. So far, the agency has not.

Included in this budget, therefore, are dozens of high-cost projects that will maintain the unsafe status quo and do very little to make DC’s streets safer or more approachable for people on foot and bike. Far too many road projects are still fixated on moving as many cars as quickly as possible, designed for the busiest hour of car traffic instead of being designed for the safety, access, and health for DC’s people. These projects’ core values should be reevaluated through a Vision Zero and Complete Streets lens and designs changed before moving forward (eg. Rhode Island Ave NE, Pennsylvania Ave SE & Potomac Ave Circle, Southern Ave, Ward 8 Streetscapes, Massachusetts Ave, U St NW, Local street repaving).

Adequate Staffing

DDOT’s bicycle and pedestrian planning staff work wonders with the resources they have at their disposal. But given the multi-year timeline and immense quantity of work required to steer even small projects through the community input process, adding 10-15 high-quality miles to the bicycle network each year is infeasible without substantially more resources. DC’s sustainability, transportation and Vision Zero goals require that this agency is capable of building the bicycle network more quickly.

Additionally, safe accommodations staff are sorely understaffed. They need sufficient people to review permit applications (around 50k plus a year) and time and attention to keep the public safe. This includes enough inspectors to actually inspect sites (creating the expectation that an inspector will be on site). Additionally, this includes enough staff to proactively educate permit applicants concerning the rules and regulations that such applicants must operate under in the District.

You can review the full budget yourself here.

For this budget, we are pushing for the following.

  1. Fully fund DDOT’s Vision Zero and bike/ped initiatives and ensure that projects on C St. NE, Florida Ave NE, and Pennsylvania Ave NW move ahead without delay;
  2. Do not fund major road projects unless they make streets safer for everyone. They must meet the criteria for Complete Streets as defined in the Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Amendment Act of 2016;
  3. Demand that DDOT adopt and follow the Complete Streets policy required by this act and ensure that all projects contribute to building complete streets, including local street repaving;
  4. Add staffing and resources to DDOT’s active transportation planning team to support an impactful expansion of DC’s low-stress and protected bicycle network by at least 15 miles each year;
  5. Add staffing and resources to DDOT’s public space team for a comprehensive approach to safe accommodations around construction sites;
  6. Reconsider the allocation of Local Streets and Sidewalk funding with an eye towards transportation equity to ensure that resources and safety investments go where they are most needed, rather than equaly across all eight wards.

Take Action

What’s Next?

The DDOT Budget Oversight Hearing is Thursday, April 11 at the Wilson Building. If you are able, consider testifying. To sign up to testify, contact Aukima Benjamin (abenjamin@dccouncil.us) or call 202-724-8062.

Check back later to see our complete testimony.

We’re Hiring: DC Bike Ambassador

Applications are closed at this time

The Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) is looking for a full-time coordinator for the DC Bike Ambassador program, an innovative grassroots approach to bicycle outreach and encouragement.

The DC Bike Ambassador Coordinator is responsible for all aspects of the Bike Ambassador program, including volunteer recruitment, training and coordination, event scheduling and staffing, and online program support and marketing. Additionally, the Bike Ambassador Coordinator will develop new strategies and approaches to bicycle outreach and encouragement in line with WABA’s commitment to equity, diversity and inclusion throughout the region. The DC Bike Ambassador, working with and coordinating volunteer Ambassadors, can be found day and night promoting bicycling  in our communities and seeking to bring better bicycling to the people of the District of Columbia.

Job Responsibilities

The DC Bike Ambassador Coordinator will:

  1. Communicate an effective and encouraging message about bikes and bicycling to employers, employees, bicyclists, motorists, and pedestrians.
  2. Develop the Bike Ambassador calendar of events and outreach campaigns in coordination with Outreach Manager and in line with WABA’s outreach goals and strategy.
  3. Plan and execute Bike Ambassador events, including: scheduling, logistics, planning, volunteer coordination, staffing events, and pulling the bicycle trailer. Events might include: workday fairs, weekend festivals, and evening rides.
  4. Coordinate recruitment and management of volunteer Bike Ambassadors to assist in events and outreach.  
  5. Assist the development, production and distribution of bicycle safety publications and deliver bike safety and education presentations.
  6. Maintain and expand the Bike Ambassador program’s unique trailer program to increase public awareness of bicyclists and encourage positive roadway behavior by all users.
  7. Responsible for Bike Ambassador program data entry, inventory, equipment maintenance, clerical work, and contributing to grant reporting, etc.
  8. Assist WABA in a non-Ambassador program capacity as needed, including staffing and supporting WABA events.
  9. Help lower barriers to bicycling, build community, and encourage new bicyclists through outreach and engagement.

Qualifications

Candidates must have:

  • A strong commitment to WABA’s mission.
  • A proven track record for being dependable, timely, and communicative.
  • The willingness to be positive, engaging, and approachable in a public setting.
  • A flexible schedule and willingness to work evenings and weekends as needed. WABA provides generous compensatory time for time worked on weekends and evenings.
  • The ability to ride a bike with a willingness to ride in mixed city traffic and off-street trails pulling a trailer.
  • A commitment to being a safe and exemplary bicyclist.
  • A commitment to respect, include, and be kind to all.
  • The willingness to further their knowledge about DC bicycle infrastructure and resources, and the societal impacts of race, gender and identity and how they intersect with their job.

Ideal candidates will have:

  • A proven track record for working collaboratively within a team.
  • Experience with leading public outreach and a thoughtful approach to big picture program strategy.
  • Excellent communication skills in informal settings and across lines of difference.
  • Confidence interacting with and serving the public.
  • Creative problem-solving skills, attention to detail and capacity to innovate.
  • The ability to organize time wisely and juggle multiple priorities.
  • Conversational fluency in Spanish, ASL, or Amharic a strong plus.
  • Lived experience as a bicyclist in DC.

WABA is committed to:

  • Providing the bicycle and job supplies
  • Promoting and building an inclusive, collaborative environment
  • Providing opportunities to learn new skills

Employment Details

This position is full-time. Expected salary range is $38,000-$43,000. The position is based in the WABA Office in Adams Morgan, Washington, DC. All employees are expected to work some evenings and weekends with compensatory time in exchange. This position will report to WABA’s Outreach Manager.

Benefits include 100% employer covered health/dental/vision insurance premiums; vacation and sick leave; committed colleagues; fun working environment; optional voluntary accident/disability insurance; WABA’s 403(b) retirement program; indoor bike parking; and surprising amounts of ice cream.

WABA is committed to providing equal employment opportunity for all persons regardless of race, color, religion, national origin, marital status, arrest record or criminal convictions, political affiliation, sexual orientation or gender identity, disability, sex, or age.

Apply

Send a cover letter and resume to jobs@waba.org. Please include “DC Bike Ambassador Coordinator” in the subject line.

Applications are closed at this time. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted. Candidates with limited internet access may call (202) 518-0524 x208.

Here are some helpful resources as your prepare your job application materials: compilation of resources and resume basics. Ideal cover letters will answer the questions: How do you fulfill the requirements of the job?; and Why do you want to promote better bicycling in DC?

About WABA

The Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) is working to create a healthy, more livable region by promoting bicycling for fun, fitness, and affordable transportation; advocating for better bicycling conditions and transportation choices for a healthier environment; and educating children, adults, and motorists about safe bicycling.

WABA’s programs, from youth education to grassroots community organizing, engage residents in Prince George’s County, Montgomery County, Alexandria, Arlington County, Fairfax County, and Washington, DC. Six thousand dues-paying members and thousands more generous supporters have helped WABA transform bicycling in the region again and again over its 46 year history.

WABA is building a region where, in 2020, we’ll see three times the number of people riding bikes. And, by 2035, every single person will live within one mile of a dedicated safe place to bike. We envision a region in which bicycling is joyful, safe, popular, and liberating; supported by the necessary infrastructure, laws, activities, and investments; and where bicycle ridership mirrors the incredible diversity of our communities.

Learn how to pilot a tandem!

Are you looking for a great opportunity to bring the fun and fitness of cycling to more people throughout the DC area, while exploring new neighborhoods and becoming part of a fun and laid-back riding group?

WABA and the Metropolitan Washington Association of Blind Athletes (MWABA) are looking for new captains (front seat) to ride with blind/visually impaired stokers (back seat) of a tandem.

WABA and MWABA!

How does it work?  MWABA provides the bikes and training for the new riders (both captains and stokers). MWABA’s tandem bicycle rides are 5:45 PM every Thursday from April to October.

But I’ve never done this before! No worries! Join MWABA and WABA on Thursday, April 4 at 5:15 PM at the Eastern Market Metro for a 30-minute orientation and tandem ride. The training and ride will be about two hours long.

If you’d like to attend the training, please email Karla Gilbride at karla.gilbride@gmail.com to ensure that there are enough bikes for everyone.

What should I bring? Helmets are required. No tandem experience (in either position) is necessary, but patience and willingness to make mistakes and learn are highly encouraged.

Do I need a bike? Most captains do not own a tandem and do not have tandem experience. Rather, they are cycling or fitness enthusiasts who want a new challenge.

What is the time commitment? The training and ride on Thursday, April 4 will be about two hours long. Once you’ve completed a training and joined the mailing list, you will receive an e-mail on Sunday asking who is interested in riding the following Thursday. You will be matched you with a stoker and receive details about the ride. You can ride as often or as infrequently as your schedule allows!

We’re Hiring: Business Partnerships Coordinator

The Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) seeks a dynamic, goal-oriented Business Partnerships Coordinator to execute WABA’s growing business partnership portfolio: business membership, corporate partnership, and event sponsorship. We seek a fundraiser with strong and sincere people skills and someone with enthusiasm for WABA’s mission. There is space for the right person to think creatively; reimagine, transform, or evolve the program; shape strategy; build a corporate social responsibility portfolio; and more.

The Business Partnerships Coordinator reports to the Development Director and works closely with WABA’s development team and collaborates regularly with other staff. Like all staff at this smaller nonprofit, this person is required to assist with general organization-wide duties and at major events.

Responsibilities

The Business Partnerships Coordinator identifies, solicits, and engages potential and current businesses/corporations to deepen partnerships and meet an annual revenue goal of $225,000+:

  • Manage and grow a portfolio of local businesses (currently 39) and corporations (currently six) giving $250 – $20,000 through cultivation and stewardship of a robust pipeline:
    • Frequent prospect research and outreach;
    • Solicitation;
    • Timely execution of contracted deliverables;
    • Regular, personalized updates and communication to funders; and
    • Quarterly, small and educational business engagement events.
  • Garner event sponsors for approximately 12 events per year, from mixers to signature rides to conferences;
    • Support other staff in designing events compelling to sponsors;
    • Craft compelling sponsorship tiers customized to each event ($1,000 – $15,000);
    • Pitch current and prospective partners on sponsorship;
    • Work with event staff and Communications team to ensure sponsorship deliverables are met before, during, and after the event;
    • Staff the event to support successful execution; and
    • Acknowledge, thank, and report to sponsors.
  • Track all engagements and activities in WABA’s CRM (Salesforce); regularly report on portfolio performance to WABA management and leadership.
  • Draft communications and guide messaging for all facets of business partnership, in collaboration with Development Director and Communications team, including email communication, blog posts, web content, social media, print collateral, and direct mail.
  • Assist the Development team with additional tasks or responsibilities as needed to achieve the team’s—and the organization’s—short- and long-term goals.

Qualifications

The ideal candidate will have:

  • Demonstrated success in—and a passion for!—fundraising;
  • An enthusiastic commitment to WABA’s mission;
  • A background in sales or business development; and
  • Experience with Salesforce.

Additional desired competencies include:

  • The ability to balance multiple tasks and priorities simultaneously;
  • A commitment to follow-through;
  • A self-motivated approach to work;
  • Strong, sincere interpersonal and communications skills, both verbal and written;
  • Computer literacy skills with experience using the Google Suite and Microsoft Office (graphic design skills a plus);
  • A willingness to jump in and help out the team;
  • The ability to lift 30 pounds; and
  • A commitment to being a safe and exemplary bicyclist if and when you ride.

Employment Details

This position is full-time. All employees are expected to work some evenings and weekends with compensatory time in exchange. Expected salary range is $38,000-$44,000. The position is based in the WABA Office in Adams Morgan, Washington, DC.

Benefits include health/dental insurance (WABA covers 100% of the premium for full-time staff); flexible work schedule; vacation, sick and personal leave; committed colleagues; fun working environment; optional voluntary accident/disability insurance; WABA’s 403(b) retirement program; indoor bike parking; and surprising amounts of ice cream.

WABA is committed to providing equal employment opportunity for all persons regardless of race, color, religion, national origin, marital status, arrest record or criminal convictions, political affiliation, sexual orientation or gender identity, disability, sex, or age.

Apply

Send a compelling cover letter and resume to jobs@waba.org. Please include “Business Partnership Coordinator” in the subject line. Applications accepted on a rolling basis until the position is filled. No phone calls or visits, please.

About WABA

The Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) is working to create a healthy, more livable region by promoting bicycling for fun, fitness, and affordable transportation; advocating for better bicycling conditions and transportation choices for a healthier environment; and educating children, adults, and motorists about safe bicycling.

WABA’s programs, from youth education to grassroots community organizing, engage residents in Prince George’s County, Montgomery County, Alexandria, Arlington County, Fairfax County, and Washington, DC. Six thousand dues-paying members and thousands more generous supporters have helped WABA transform bicycling in the region again and again over its 47 year history.

WABA is building a region where, in 2020, we’ll see three times the number of people riding bikes. And, by 2035, every single person will live within one mile of a dedicated safe place to bike. We envision a region in which bicycling is joyful, safe, popular, and liberating; supported by the necessary infrastructure, laws, activities, and investments; and where bicycle ridership mirrors the incredible diversity of our communities.

Recap: Washington Region 2019 Vision Zero Summit

In the District, Vision Zero is a commitment to ending traffic fatalities by 2024, (though traffic fatalities continue to increase). What many people don’t know is that Montgomery County and the city of Alexandria have also made Vision Zero commitments and are working towards that goal.

On March 14th, we brought the advocates, engineers, elected officials, reporters, and more, together from around the region to have a discussion about the state of Vision Zero.

The third Washington Region Vision Zero Summit was different from previous years for a number of reasons. We were intentional about bringing the Summit to community members and residents who are unable a day-long conference. So, on the evening prior to the Summit, we brought the Community Listening Session on Traffic Safety right to residents. We held it in Anacostia because data shows that traffic crashes are disproportionately higher east of the Anacostia River.

And we cannot make any progress on making streets in D.C. safer if we do not address the needs of those who have been underserved.

On March 14th, we held the third annual Washington Region Vision Zero Summit at the George Washington University Milken Institute of School of Public Health.

Vision Zero is a public health crisis and it’s on agency staff and elected officials bear the heavy burden of putting policies in place to protect all road users. The number of traffic fatalities has increased since Mayor Muriel Bowser committed Vision Zero in 2015. Our morning keynote speaker, LaQuandra S. Nesbitt, MD, MPH, provided data that confirms what we know: D.C.’s trends are moving in the wrong direction.

The Summit brought together elected officials, agency staff, engineers, planners, regional advocates, thought leaders, and the private sector to come up with better solutions to make our roads better and safer for all users. During her Fireside Chat, Mayor Bowser reiterated that the number one issue that all wards deal with is speeding. (View the full video of the Fireside Chat here.)

Hearing the stories of near-misses and people who have lost loved ones in preventable crashes is difficult. But we cannot be disheartened about moving this work forward. Eliminating traffic fatalities in the District by 2024 is not an easy goal. It requires holding those in power accountable and demanding better street design.

The end result? Creating roads for everyone including kids, senior citizens, those with disabilities, and people using all travel modes.

Also new to this year’s Summit was Emily Simons, a graphic recorder who visually captured the Community Listening Session and a handful of panels at the Summit. Not with photos — Emily captured our discussions with beautiful, hand-drawn illustrations. View all of her graphic recordings from the Community Listening Session and the Summit here! (Click to enlarge each photo.)

Find a gallery of photos from the Community Listening Listening Session and Vision Zero Summit below.


Thank you to our sponsors of this year’s Summit!

Title Sponsor:

With support from:

Platinum Sponsor:

Gold Sponsors:

Silver Sponsors:

Bronze Sponsors:

Meet the Sprouts Ride!

Happy first day of spring! We have some very exciting news: we are launching two new signature events this spring! You heard right. Two. New. Events.

First comes the Sprouts Ride, on Sunday, April 28th. For those of you who have been attending WABA events for awhile, you probably remember that this the time of year when we usually hosted the Vasa Ride. Well, 2018 was the last Vasa Ride, and the Sprouts Ride is not just a rebrand—it’s a whole new thing!

WABA’s newest spring ride is coming soon! Meet the Sprouts Ride. 🌱

Learn more and sign up here!

As with all WABA signature rides, the Sprouts Ride is a fundraiser for WABA. We organize five big rides per year to convene our bike community, have a good time riding together, and raise money for WABA’s advocacy, education, and outreach across the region.

The Sprouts Ride is going to be FUN. Starting at REI’s flagship store in the NoMa neighborhood of Washington, DC, we’ve planned 5-mile and 15-mile routes, rolling past iconic local landmarks, premier regional multi-use trails, and wonderful city neighborhoods. These routes are the perfect chance for you to relax and enjoy some springtime biking in the city, to bring your kids along, or invite a friend who is new to biking. (We’ll also set up pit stops, so you can get that perfect photo op.)

A great thing about the Sprouts Ride is that your day doesn’t end after you get off your bike. We’ve got you covered: REI’s flagship store in NoMa is hosting a celebration of all things bicycling that will feature food, drinks, and music from a live band for the afternoon. Hang out and enjoy the afternoon at REI, grab a drink at Red Bear Brewing next door, or explore the many offerings of the surrounding NoMa neighborhood.

So—start spring off on a good foot, get your friends and family together, and get outside for some two-wheeled urban fun!

Register!

But wait…what about the second ride? I’m going to keep that a secret for a little bit longer. But, I will strongly encourage you to mark your calendar for Saturday, June 15th.

Thoughts on scooters? Share them with us.

Electric scooters joined the transportation landscape in a big way less than two years ago. The two-wheel, battery-powered scooters are available for rent via a mobile app. Companies such as Spin, Lime, Bird, Bolt, Lyft, and Skip are currently offering scooter sharing services in DC and Arlington while looking to expand the dockless service into other local communities.

The growing availability of scooters presents many possible benefits and creates potential concerns. WABA is developing an organizational position on scooters and we would like your input.

Please share your thoughts and feedback about scooters via our short survey. The survey should only take a few minutes to complete and helps us better understand the community’s thoughts about this new mode of transportation. WABA will use the input from the survey and other research to develop a position on scooters that will inform future advocacy, outreach and education efforts.

Take The Survey

It’s important for us to share that our corporate partners do include companies that offer scooter services. Lime, Spin, JUMP, Bird and Lyft are corporate supporters of WABA or sponsor events. This survey was not developed in coordination with any corporate supporter of WABA, scooter company or otherwise. The board and staff will developed the organizational policy regarding electric scooters independently from corporate partners or sponsors.

Thanks for providing your input and please share the survey with your network.