Photo Recap Of The Coldest-est Day Of The Year Ride

As biking becomes a more popular, more safe, and more normal form of transportation in our region, more people are giving winter commuting a try.

To encourage and celebrate more year-round biking our Women & Bicycles program partnered up with The Bike House to host the Coldest-est Day of The Year Ride.

Thanks to all who joined us, the marshals, the sunshine, and thanks Paul L. for documenting the coldest-est fun!

 

 

The Hains Point 100 raised over $8,000 for WABA!

Hains Point 100 Group Photo

Hooray!

She did it! 300+ people did it! For a third year in a row Megan Jones coordinated and inspired the regional bike community to join together at Hains Point and ride in circles for 100 miles — in December. What a feat!

“I started the ride on a whim – as a personal challenge” Megan told us, “and then realized it could expand into a warm and welcoming atmosphere for my friends to come together and be active in a cold and dreary time. Three years later I can’t believe it’s grown to become such an awesome tool of encouragement and support. The ride is challenging and inspiring people who are new to biking – especially women. All that coupled with fundraising for WABA’s Women & Bicycles program. It’s more than I could have ever imagined!”

Thank you to all those who rode, donated, or sponsored the Hains Point 100. WABA is so grateful. You helped contribute over $8,000 for our Women & Bicycles program! We will still need to continue the fundraising drive again in March.  But don’t worry, the program will continue until then. We were inspired by Megan and partnered up with The Bike House to host The Coldest-est Day of the Year Ride this Sunday.

 

This Sunday’s Third-Annual Hains Point 100!

7115887If you haven’t attempted to bike 33 continuous laps around Hains Point, then the Hains Point 100 is the best time to try!

Click here for information and to register.

If biking 100 miles isn’t tempting, then divide 100 miles among your friends, bike 100km, try 100 minutes, or maybe you just want to come out and cheer on the 200+ riders.

Whatever you decide,  there’s something for everyone at this event: a community potluck, photo booth, playground, an unbelievable pile of raffle prizes, and a few surprises! Plus all the proceeds go to our Women & Bicycles program.

Registration is an encouraged donation of anywhere between $10 and $1,000. Donate what you can to help fund next year’s Women & Bicycles program.

Thanks so much to organizer, Megan Jones and to all the support from the event sponsors.

Bring Your Friends to Our Winter Biking Workshop

e6MXyK7ObZyMVaWZ7KTNlYi1U8M0BlyNV1r6XhihuwIThis is part of our Women & Bicycles blog series,  part of WABA’s initiative to build a stronger women’s bike community and get more women on bikes.  These posts aren’t exclusive to women, but they’re produced with and through the Women & Bicycles’ programming.
Click here to learn more and get involved.

 

Even though leaves and temperatures are dropping, your bike riding doesn’t have to! That’s why we’re hosting a workshop on winter biking for anyone looking to learn about how to commute in the cold, the wet, and the wet and cold.

Join us to learn tips and tricks, gear suggestions, biking techniques, and general approaches to winter biking. Come with your questions and concerns, or your own ideas to share.

Pedaling Professionally Winter

Date: Sunday, November 23rd, 2014
Time: 1:00pm to 3:00pm
Location: 130 M St NE, Washington, DC 20002
Click here for more information and to R.S.V.P.

If you can’t make it, join Black Women Bike DC this Saturday for their winter biking workshop at the Northeast Branch Library! Click here for more information.

Women & Bicycles Tip: Your Helmet May Not Be Protecting You

e6MXyK7ObZyMVaWZ7KTNlYi1U8M0BlyNV1r6XhihuwIThis is part of our Women & Bicycles blog series,  part of WABA’s initiative to build a stronger women’s bike community and get more women on bikes.  These posts aren’t exclusive to women, but they’re produced with and through the Women & Bicycles’ programming.
Click here to learn more and get involved.

We recommend and teach responsible, predictable, confident biking. We teach you to bike where you are most visible,  bike in visible clothing, and bike so that other road users can predict your behaviors.

We also teach that helmets are really your last line of defense on the road. So we definitely recommend them. But there’s a good chance your helmet isn’t protecting you at all, because so many people don’t know how to fit them properly.

If your helmet is not fit to your head properly, it’s not doing you any good.

 

Six Common Helmet-Fit Problems:

Helmet 11

Problem 1.)  You forget to buckle your helmet!
If it’s not buckled, it’s the same as wearing no
helmet at all.


Problem 2.) You have not adjusted the helmet clasps
(the plastic piece that joins the two straps on one side)
to fit below your ears. This woman’s helmet clasps are
nearly below her chin.


Problem 3.)You have not shortened the helmet straps
to sit snug around your face so that the buckle
sits securely below your chin. The straps should
be tight enough such that you can only fit two fingers
between your chin and the buckle.


Helmet 3Problem 4.) You’ve adjusted your helmet properly,
but you put it on backwards, a mistake countless
bicyclists in the D.C. area make every day.


Problem 5.) Your helmet straps are too loose,
so the brim of your helmet isn’t sitting level across
the top of your eyebrows.


Helmet 6
Problem 6.) Your helmet straps and clasps are too loose,
so the brim of  your helmet is not just above your eyebrows.
This woman’s helmet is sitting at the top of her forehead instead
of just above her eyebrows.  Her forehead would not be protected in a crash.


Perfect Helmet Fit Looks Like This:


The helmet is facing forward and buckled
The helmet clasps sit right below her ears
The helmet buckle is snug below her chin
The helmet brim is level and  just above her eyebrows

 

To make sure your helmet fits properly, click here to watch a tutorial by the League of American Bicyclists.

And please remember, just because you’ve strapped a helmet, doesn’t mean you’re any more safe on our roads. Fit your helmet properly and attend a WABA class to practice visible, predictable, and confident biking (classes are $10 and hosted throughout the region).

 

 

 

Women & Bicycles Tip: Bring Back The Romper!

e6MXyK7ObZyMVaWZ7KTNlYi1U8M0BlyNV1r6XhihuwIThis is part of our Women & Bicycles blog series,  part of WABA’s initiative to build a stronger women’s bike community and get more women on bikes.  These posts aren’t exclusive to women, but they’re produced with and through the Women & Bicycles’ programming. Click here to learn more and get involved.

 

All the buzz  over the Penny In Yo’  Pants #CycleHack has me buzzin over my personal preferred bike-friendly feminine formal wear: rompers.

Rompers are lovely to bike in. I own six or seven. Rompers are like dresses except the bottom half is shorts or pants. They’re comfortable, lightweight, and dress-like plus you don’t have to worry about pulling a Marilyn Monroe or getting your skirt caught all up in yo’ wheel spokes.

So, yes, by all means continue rocking your skirts and dresses on your commute, and if you haven’t worn a romper since 1987, bring it back!

 

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Women & Bicycles Tip: Steer Clear of Streetcar Tracks

e6MXyK7ObZyMVaWZ7KTNlYi1U8M0BlyNV1r6XhihuwIThis is part of our Women & Bicycles blog series,  part of WABA’s initiative to build a stronger women’s bike community and get more women on bikes.  These posts aren’t exclusive to women, but they’re produced with and through the Women & Bicycles’ programming.
Click here to learn more and get involved.

 

DC Streetcars on Pennsylvania Ave

Image courtesy of Flickr user DC Streetcar

Even though  Streetcar won’t be up and running until 2015 (at the earliest), people who bike along the H Street corridor interact with the system on a regular basis. These interactions are not always friendly.

Since the  installation of tracks along the H Street corridor, WABA has received many reports of bike crashes involving the tracks. Here are the three most important tips for avoiding hazardous encounters with streetcar tracks:

1. Never ride between the tracks.

seguiMI

Image courtesy of Flickr user SeguiMI

2. Always cross at a 90 degree angle.

Streetcar tracks

Image courtesy of Flickr user Jonathan Maus

3. Use alternative routes.  Contraflow bike lanes on G St. and I St. NE offer safe alternatives for bicyclists going east and westbound.