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Posts Tagged ‘Women & Bicycles’

Buy Women & Bicycles Swag

Will you be at WABA’s first-ever Sadie Hawkins Dance this Friday? It’s a fundraiser for our much-loved, super-successful, absolutely awesome Women & Bicycles program. If you liked Bike Prom, you’ll love Sadie Hawkins.

You can also support the Women & Bicycles program by buying stuff! We’ve got reflective bands and American Apparel T-shirts, both branded with the program’s logo, for sale. Click here to purchase your tickets to the Sadie Hawkins Dance or purchase Women & Bicycles merchandise.

Check out our staff modeling the swag:For

leg bands

 

leg bands in light

 

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Women & Bicycles Tip: Time To Spring Bike Clean!

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This entry is part of our Women & Bicycles blog series. Women & Bicycles is WABA’s outreach and encouragement initiative to build a stronger women’s bike community and get more women on bikes. These posts certainly aren’t exclusive to women, but they’re produced with and through the Women & Bicycles’ programming and staffing. Click here to learn more and get involved.

 

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Winter is rough on bikes, but it’s incrementally warming up. Get outside and show your bike some love!

This week, Women & Bicycles rode, washed, and maintained their bikes. Team Sticky Fingers hosted a Bike Washy PartAY in Arlington, which included a 15-mile ride, food, beer, and bike-washing skillshares from the team. Thanks to ProGold Bikes, everyone had the perfect materials to give their bikes a thorough cleaning.

Then, we joined Alexandria’s VeloCity Bike Co-op to learn about DIY bike maintenance. The shop staff and volunteers from the Bike House showed off how to tinker away the squeaks and creaks from the winter season.

Get inspired by our photos below the jump, then consider the 15-minute bike wash. This weekend would be perfect for some bike-washing and tinkering!

This weekend is also perfect to support Women & Bicycles. This Friday, March 14, is WABA’s Sadie Hawkins Dance at Chief Ike’s Mambo Room, which will raise money for the 2014 season of Women & Bicycles. Tickets are $10 in advance and $15 at the door.  Read the rest of this entry »

Announcing Goldsprints at Friday’s Sadie Hawkins Dance

Will you be at WABA’s first-ever Sadie Hawkins Dance this Friday? It’s a fundraiser for our much-loved, super-successful, absolutely awesome Women & Bicycles program. If you liked Bike Prom, you’ll love Sadie Hawkins.

In addition to free pizza, $3 beers, DJs spinning sweet jams, contests, games, and a raffle, there will be goldsprints! Thanks to Sciathan Productions, you’ll be able to race against other partygoers, tournament-style, for the title of Ms. and Mr. Sadie Hawkins. Goldsprints are part stationary bike race, part spectator sport, and an overall riveting social showdown.

Purchase your tickets now for $10. Tickets are $15 at the door.

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Sadie Hawkins Dance: It’s Like Bike Prom, But Better

Will you be at WABA’s first-ever Sadie Hawkins Dance this Friday? It’s a fundraiser for our much-loved, super-successful, absolutely awesome Women & Bicycles program. If you liked Bike Prom, you’ll love Sadie Hawkins.

Join us Friday, March 14 from 7:30 p.m.-2 a.m. at Chief Ike’s Mambo Room (1725 Columbia Road NW) in Adams Morgan, D.C. Tickets are $10 in advance or $15 at the door.

BUY TICKETS NOW (OR PAY MORE AT THE DOOR)

Ladies, bring your date! We want to pack Chief Ike’s with over 300 bicyclists and friends for this inaugural Sadie Hawkins dance party. Expect free pizza, $3 beers, DJs spinning sweet jams, contests, games, and a raffle. It’s like Bike Prom—but way better, and benefitting Women & Bicycles.

Limited bike parking will be available (for the first 100 riders) and Women & Bicycles merch will be for sale. Come ready to support our program with your cash. We need your financial support to make the 2014 edition of Women & Bicycles just as great as its inaugural year.

BUY TICKETS NOW
$10: Advance ticket
$15: Ticket at the door
$25: Ticket + reflective leg band
$55: Ticket + reflective leg band + T-shirt
CAN’T MAKE IT? DONATE HERE

Want to help us pull off the Sadie Hawkins Dance and our other outreach programming? Come to our volunteer night this Thursday, 6-8 p.m. Sign up to volunteer here.

Announcing WABA’s Sadie Hawkins Dance Party

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Join WABA next Friday, March 14th in celebrating the one-year anniversary of our Women & Bicycles Program.

We’ve replaced Bike Prom with a raucous evening of festivities. All funds go to support the 2014 Women & Bicycles’ season of workshops, meetups, rides, and Roll Models to inspire more women to bike. This is a co-ed party, but remember gals invite their dates!

You can expect bike parking, local DJ’s, dancing, bike-themed games, food and drink specials, awards, and some surprises along the way.

 

Sadie Hawkins Dance Party

Date: Friday, March 14th, 2014
Time: 7:30pm to 2:00am
Location: 1725 Columbia Rd NW
Ticket Price: $10 online, $15 at the door

Purchase tickets

Women & Bicycles Tip: Try This One Great Grocery Trick

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This entry is part of our Women & Bicycles blog series. Women & Bicycles is WABA’s outreach and encouragement initiative to build a stronger women’s bike community and get more women on bikes. These posts certainly aren’t exclusive to women, but they’re produced with and through the Women & Bicycles’ programming and staffing. Click here to learn more and get involved.

 

Do you have panniers, those bags that clip on the side of a bike rack? After years of using a messenger bag, I am now a faithful pannier user and call them my Mary Poppins bags.

Here’s a trick for other pannier users: When grocery shopping, clip your panniers on the front, inside, or outside of your shopping cart during checkout. It’s a simple way to load up and make sure the heavy stuff goes to the bottom, the lighter stuff stays on top, and that weight is evenly dispersed between the two bags.

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My friend Meredith demonstrating the pannier method of shopping.

Panniers turn your bike into a pickup truck: They offer the carrying capacity of nearly two weeks’ worth of groceries, everything but the kitchen sink for a family trip to the park,  or simply all the odds and ends that you need daily. And with panniers, you don’t have to worry about the strain, weight, or sweat from carrying a backpack.

If you’re in the market for panniers, click here to read Momentum‘s reviews on over a dozen different options to choose from.

And speaking of groceries, biking, and WABA’s Women & Bicycles program, are you coming to the Women & Bicycles happy hour tonight at Glen’s Garden Market in Dupont? We’ll be there from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Click here for more details.

Women & Bicycles Tip: The 15-Minute Bike Wash

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This entry is part of our Women & Bicycles blog series. Women & Bicycles is WABA’s outreach and encouragement initiative to build a stronger women’s bike community and get more women on bikes. These posts certainly aren’t exclusive to women, but they’re produced with and through the Women & Bicycles’ programming and staffing. Click here to learn more and get involved.

 

I went 5 years without thinking much about bike maintenance or repair.  I figured, hey, if ain’t broke don’t fix it. I was frugal, but mostly lazy.

After learning this 15-minute bike wash technique, I’ve saved time and money. Keeping my bike clean–especially my chain–has prevented my bike from rusting, maintained my shifting, and minimized the amount of bike grease buildup on the right legs of my pants.

Frequency:
While  some folks religiously and meticulously deep-clean their bikes, I stick to my lazy ways and wash my bike after every major rain or about once a month, whichever comes first. 

Materials:

  • Liquid degreaser: I use SimpleGreen. It’s affordable,  non-toxic, and biodegradable.
  • Bike lube: Click here for Bicycling  magazine’s review of lubes
  • Rags (old T-shirts make great ones)
  • Bucket or wide bowl
  • Water
  • Used toothbrush

Be sure you’re wearing clothing you’re willing to get messy, and consider plastic gloves if you want to avoid grease-stained hands.

Location:
Turn your bike upside down in a backyard, patio, or driveway space. If you don’t have access to outdoor space, put down some towels or newspaper in your kitchen, soap up your steed in your bathtub, or ride to your local car wash.

Bicycle cleaning

Photo via Flickr user osto

Step 1: Rinse
Rinse with the hose, showerhead, or your bucket of water to get rid of the big dirt and the grit. This rinse is important because any bit of gravel or sand left behind will scratch your paint when you go to scrub.

Bike wash

Photo via Flickr user Cyclelicious

Step 2: Scrub
Spray or lather up your entire bike with degreaser (using a 1:1 water:degreaser solution) then scrub the dirtiest parts first, like your drivetrain. Use your toothbrush or any other bike-specific scrubbers on your chain, chain ring (front gears), and sprockets (rear gears).

Week 14 - Cleaning the Chain

Image via Flickr user MVCornelius

After you’ve given your drivetrain a thorough scrub and removed all the gunky buildup, use the rag to get into the nooks and crannies of your frame.

bike washing day

Flickr image via Thalia Kamarga

Step 3: Rinse
Rinse gently while removing as much of the degreaser as possible. The more degreaser left around, the more dirt it will attract later on

Wash down.

Image via Flickr user MFGCyclocross

Step 4: Dry
Dry your bike thoroughly. The bike experts recommend drying off your bike, especially the drivetrain, every time they’re out in wet conditions. Rusting is bad news. I keep a hand towel by my door and where I store my bike.

Bike Wash

Image via Flickr user J Holland

Step 5: Re-lube your chain
Lube up your chain while your bike is still upside down. It’s nice to get a good rhythm here. Hold the lube bottle in one hand and hold your pedal with the other. Rest the tip of the lube bottle in the middle of one of your chain lines, then start to slowly turn the pedal so that you’re getting a drop of lube in every chain link.

After you’ve lubed up every chain link, rotate your pedal a couple times so the lube settles down into the chain. Don’t shift here, just rotate the pedals. I used to shift my gears around thinking I needed to get lube in the gears and the derailleur (the mechanism that shifts your chain). But no, the chain is the only part that needs lubing.

Chain Lube

Image via Flickr user Garrett Lau

Step 6: Remove the excess lube
This is essential! Take the rag you used to dry off your bike and remove as much lube as you can from your chain. The most time efficient technique is to lightly hold the rag around the chain while slowly pedaling with the other hand.

cleaning bike chains is so hot

Image via Flickr user Amy

Things I’ve Learned Along the Way:

  • Never use WD-40, ever
  • Don’t spray your bike down with too much force or you’ll waterlog your parts
  • Always remove as much lube and degreaser as possible or your bike will quickly collect more dirt
  • Cleaning your bike is like changing a flat tire: We all have different approaches and tips to share
  • Remember to appreciate your smooth-shifting, good-looking, squeak-free ride!

Women & Bicycles Tip: Know Your Bike Infrastructure

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This entry is part of our Women & Bicycles blog series. Women & Bicycles is WABA’s outreach and encouragement initiative to build a stronger women’s bike community and get more women on bikes. These posts certainly aren’t exclusive to women, but they’re produced with and through the Women & Bicycles’ programming and staffing. Click here to learn more and get involved.

There’s a good chance the bike infrastructure we use today wasn’t around when you learned to ride a bike (and it probably wasn’t mentioned in your drivers’ ed course).  This week, we’d like to help you familiarize yourself with some different types of bike facilities out there.

Sharrow
Madison Dr closed to traffic - lovely! #bikedc #shutdown
Sharrows are street markings that serve as reminders to road users that bicyclists have rights to the lanes on these routes—even though cyclists may, for the most part, legally ride in the road. Sharrows are often placed on routes that see more bike traffic or on streets that are too narrow for drivers to pass bicyclists safely as reminders.

Bike Lane
Spectacular bike commute weather this morning, but riding directly into the sun is a challenge!
Bike lanes provide a dedicated space for bicyclists on the roadway. Without a lack of physical barriers, however, cyclists still must be wary of riding in the “door zone,” the 3 to 5 foot area along parked cars, double-parked vehicles, road debris, and turning vehicles. Parking in bike lanes is illegal in D.C., Maryland, and Virginia.

Cycletrack
Penn Av bike lane
Cycletracks are protected bike lanes. Some provide physical barriers from other road-users and effectively form an on-street bike path. Click here to check out 19 creative ways cities are protecting cycletracks.

Wayfinding
Metropolitan Branch On-road Trail Sign
Yes, if you build it, they will come. But first, people need to know what you’ve built! Wayfinding encompasses things such as street signs placed throughout the region to direct bicyclists to trails, paths, and other amenities.

Bike Box
2012 11 22 - 5189 - DC - L St at 11th St NW
Bike boxes give priority to bicyclists at intersections by providing a designated space to queue up in front of cars. Bike boxes improve the visibility of bicyclists and can help prevent right-hook collisions.

Mixing Zone
Sunny, at this point in the ride
Mixing zones are merging areas. Traffic that is turning at intersections must yield to bicyclists just like they would with another automobile and enter the mixing zone. Sometimes this means the vehicle may need to wait in the bike lane at the intersection before turning. This is perfectly fine as long as the driver yielded to bicyclists.

Bicycle Corrals
Washington, DC bike corral
Bike corrals are an efficient use of on-street bike parking. They transform a parking space or sidewalk area into bike parking. Portland just recently installed its 100th bike parking corral! How many have you spotted in our region?

The future of bike infrastructure?! Bike superhighways, underground bike parking systems, bike overpasses…and maybe even SkyCycle, an elevated bike network of bike paths.

Women & Bicycles Tip: Learn Bike Etiquette From Your Legos

e6MXyK7ObZyMVaWZ7KTNlYi1U8M0BlyNV1r6XhihuwIThis entry is part of our Women & Bicycles blog series. Women & Bicycles is WABA’s outreach and encouragement initiative to build a stronger women’s bike community and get more women on bikes. These posts certainly aren’t exclusive to women, but they’re produced with and through the Women & Bicycles’ programming and staffing. Click here to learn more and get involved.

 

The city of Edmonton created these five fun bike shorts that demonstrate some of the basic–and some of the esoteric–responsibilities of urban bicyclists. Take a look!

Riding and Driving Safely

The Case of the Dashed Bike Lane

Dial S for Sharrow

Get Behind It

Coaching Corners: left Turns for Cyclists

10 Reasons You Should Ride The Hains Point 100

e6MXyK7ObZyMVaWZ7KTNlYi1U8M0BlyNV1r6XhihuwIThis entry is part of our Women & Bicycles blog series. Women & Bicycles is WABA’s outreach and encouragement initiative to build a stronger women’s bike community and get more women on bikes. These posts certainly aren’t exclusive to women, but they’re produced with and through the Women & Bicycles’ programming and staffing. Click here to learn more and get involved.

 

HP 100 half poster

The Hains Point 100 is back for 2013! Here are 10 reasons you should ride 100 miles in circles around Hains Point on Dec. 22:

  1. It’s basically a choose-your-own-adventure ride. Start when you want. Ride as long as you want. Pause, snack, sprint, nap, and draft when you want.
  2. The route is riding in circles around Hains Point. It’s impossible to get lost or off-track and it’s unnecessary to have to rely on any kind of electronic device to find your away around.
  3. Did someone say potluck? You’re bringing snacks—brownies—right?
  4. Look at all the awesome ride sponsors! Must. Win. Raffle.
  5. You’ll ride with the finest of D.C.’s bike advocacy community, including all those people on Twitter you know only by icon, all those people from the forum you know only by signature, and all those people at advocacy meetings you know only by testimony. And you’ll bond over the fact that you’re still in D.C. three days before Christmas, riding your bike in circles in the wind around a peninsula.
  6. This is a locally organized, sustainable, homegrown, organic event, coordinated by one very dedicated supporter of the Women & Bicycles program.
  7. You’ll get bragging rights for riding (or attempting to ride) 100 miles around Hains Point.
  8. Riding 100 miles around Hains Point is a great opportunity to practice your counting. One hundred miles is 33 laps!
  9. Normalize winter riding!
  10. Your donations to the Hains Point 100 will help get more women on bikes. One hundred percent of the ride proceeds will be donated to WABA’s Women & Bicycles program, helping to fund another year of dedicated outreach.

This holiday season, give yourself the gift of an all-age, all-experience level, all-joyful, only slightly delusional century: the Hains Point 100. For more information on the ride, please visit the event website, find it on Facebook, and follow Hains Point 100 on Twitter.

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