The Insurance Lobby is trying to block a Contributory Negligence fix.

On Thursday, AAA Mid-Atlantic sent a disingenuous email to its DC members with some exaggerated claims about the effects of the Motor Vehicle Collision Recovery Act of 2015. The bill, which fixes a glaring injustice in our legal system, goes up for a D.C. Council vote on Tuesday.

If you haven’t yet, please send a note to your Councilmembers asking them to support the bill. You can also join us on the steps of the Wilson Building on Tuesday morning to show support for the bill.

Contact your Councilmembers

On Friday afternoon, WABA circulated a memo debunking the insurance lobby’s claims to Councilmembers and their staff . Here is a summary of the memo:

Property Casualty Insurers of America (“PCI”), a national trade association representing auto insurers in D.C., has circulated a misleading “analysis” of bicycle and pedestrian crash data to suggest that if the Motor Vehicle Collision Recovery Act of 2015 (B21-4) passes, auto insurance rates will jump 24%. A careful evaluation of the analysis shows that it is based upon flawed assumptions and grossly inflated cost data.

The primary flaw in the analysis was the use of an outdated (2004) study to determine the total lifetime costs of traffic crash injuries to bicyclists and pedestrians to society, not actual insurance claims. Using this much larger and inflated estimate, the PCI analysis exaggerates the impact. More importantly, no evidence was presented to suggest a causal relationship exists between the legislation and insurance rates, and if that was the case, what the actual rise in rates could be, if any.

The PCI analysis assumes 100% of crashes will involve DC-insured drivers. According to the 2014 DDOT Traffic Safety Statistics Report, only 37% of total traffic crashes involve a DC driver. Maryland and Virginia drivers alone account for 46.9% of all crashes in the District. The costs of crashes associated with bicyclists and pedestrians would be spread much further into the regional insurance pool, not solely in the District’s.

Finally, for some context, bicycle and pedestrian traffic injuries account for only 15% of total traffic injuries in D.C. according the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments. The need for fair compensation for injured bicyclists and pedestrians is great and insurers of negligent drivers should be responsible for harm caused. But, to claim that compensation of an additional 15% of total injuries would cause such significant increase to auto insurance rates is not credible.

In cases where a bicyclist or pedestrian is the less negligent party, the victim should be entitled to fair compensation and not 100% barred from recovery, as is the law in 46 other states.

Contact your Councilmembers

Hundreds of miles of trails are coming to Prince George’s County

TrolleyTrail-08

Photo: Leah L Jones

Hundreds of miles of trails are coming to Prince George’s County, and you get a say in the matter!

The county’s Trails Master Plan (still in draft form), identifies how Prince George’s County intends to build and manage nearly 400 miles of new trails, a benchmark set forth in Formula 2040 (the 2013 functional master plan for parks, recreation and open spaces).

The county set the bar high for trail development. Now it’s time for implementation, and the Trails Master Plan identifies how to make trail development and maintenance a functional and operational priority across the county.

That’s important because the demand for trails in Prince George’s County is incredible. Our members and supporters have made it clear—trails are important to them. And they’re not alone. Trails are the #1 amenity that residents want, according to a 2012 Prince George’s County survey. Having a trail network that connects the whole county will serve both residents and visitors, and the Trails Master Plan is a critical step to closing key gaps, getting trails to new parts of the county, and elevating the importance of bike and pedestrian infrastructure within the county’s parks and planning processes.

Some of the plan’s highlights include a three-tier designation for trails (primary, secondary, and recreational), depending on the expected type of use. Primary trails are classified as mostly paved, with high-quality design features, a park-like experience, and used for both recreation and transportation. The Plan takes the mileage of primary trails in the county from 65 to 293!

Secondary trails are also mostly paved, but are connectors, along roads, or within neighborhoods. The intention for these trails are not as major commuting routes, but as connectors and shorter trips. The Plan takes the mileage of secondary trails in the county from 110 to nearly 400.

Recreational trails are mostly unpaved and serve a nearly-exclusively recreational purpose. The Plan takes the mileage of recreational trails in the county from 153 to 255.

But it’s not just about trail development. The County’s plan also has recommendations for maintenance and operations for the existing and future facilities. The plan stresses the importance of dedicated funding sources for trails to allow the county to stay up to date on maintenance needs of the trail network.

The plan still needs refinement, and Prince George’s County is accepting public comments until 11:59 p.m. on June 23, 2016. Read the plan and submit your comments here.

The draft plan includes a handful of long-time Prince George’s priorities. For example, the Washington, Baltimore and Annapolis (WB&A) Trail has been on the county priority list for years, and is one of WABA’s advocacy priorities. When completed, the WB&A could become the eastern spoke of the Washington area’s trail network. Just over 10 miles of trails are already built, but it does not yet connect to the District of Columbia or the rest of the regional trail grid.

Since 2008, WABA has urged the County to extend the WB&A Trail west along MD-704. Since 2011, building a trail along MD-704 has been at the top of the County’s bike and pedestrians transportation funding priorities for Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA). And with inclusion in the county’s Trails Master Plan, the message is clear- it’s time to finish the WB&A.

Do you support the completion of the WB&A Trail? Are there other trails that are equally important to you? Tell the County which trail corridors you’d like to see completed first.

We encourage all Prince George’s County residents to submit their input about trails in their county. Do you use trails to get to work, school, or the store? Let the County know that trails are a vital part of our transportation system.

Would you ride year-round if you knew the trail would be plowed? Do you have to ride over the same bumpy section of trail everyday on your way to school? Let the County know that you depend on the off-road infrastructure, and trails should be treated with the same maintenance concern as roads.

Would you like more lighting on the trail corridor near your office? Would you take your kids on the trail network if there were more bathrooms, water fountains or parks? Would you like wayfinding signage to help you navigate the network? Speak up for the trailside amenities you want.

Are you far from a trail that would get you anywhere? Are you frustrated by a “trail to nowhere” in your neighborhood? Let the County know that you want to be connected by trail to the larger network.

Your input is needed to make Prince George’s Trails Master Plan even better. Speak up before it’s too late! Take the county’s survey before 11:59 p.m. on June 23, 2016.

June Advocacy Roundup

 

Discussing details of intersection design at Spring St. and Covesville Rd

Discussing details of intersection design at Spring St. and Covesville Rd

Here’s the latest version of “what we’ve been up to lately.” Read straight through or skip ahead to updates from Maryland, Virginia, or DC.

If there’s a specific project that you don’t see here, check our March and April roundups.


Want this update by email every month?  Yes!







Greater Washington Region

Metro SafeTrack — Try it by bike!

Brief Explanation: WABA has been working closely with WMATA, the District Department of Transportation, and other local agencies to provide comprehensive alternative bike routes, temporary street safety accommodations, bike convoys and bike buddies to help folks around the region try their commute by bike during SafeTrack safety surges.

Current Status: The first safety surge, East Falls Church to Ballston, began June 4th and will continue through June 16th. The surges will continue rolling through the year.

Action to Take: Volunteer with WABA during SafeTrack by signing up here. We need bike buddies, convoy leaders, and more— now, and as the year unfolds.

National Park Service Paved Trails Plan

Brief Explanation: In April, the National Park Service released a draft of a study for creating a seamless trail network for the Washington Region. It includes 120 capital and programmatic recommendations, many of which are excellent.

Current Status: WABA and supporters submitted formal comments and more than 1,000 supportive petition signatures. The comment period has closed.  We anticipate the study to be finalized and released by fall 2016.


Virginia

Protected Bike Lanes on Memorial Bridge

Brief Explanation: The National Park Service is in the process of rehabilitating the Arlington Memorial bridge. The partial closure and rehabilitation of the bridge represents a huge opportunity to rethink how the bridge operates in the context of the city’s transportation network. WABA has asked that NPS be forward-thinking about the design, and include protected bike lanes across the bridge and better connections to the memorials on either side of the bridge.

Current Status: WABA and supporters raised these issues three years ago. Unfortunately, the Park Service has not listened and continues to move forward with an Environmental Assessment structured to protecte the status quo.

Custis Trail Improvements

Brief Explanation: The widening of I-66 inside the beltway will likely result in increased car traffic in Arlington from jurisdictions west, posing challenges for the bicycle and smart-growth-oriented county. As a partial mitigation of the highway expansion, Virgina should reconstruct and upgrade the Custis Trail from the Beltway to the Potomac River, including shortening and flattening circuitous sections and removing all trail grades in excess of five percent.

Current Status: WABA sent a letter to the Arlington County Board requesting that they ask the Virginia Department of Transportation to undertake these trail improvements as part of the highway expansion project. Download and view the letter here.


Maryland

Silver Spring Circle Protected Bike Lane Project

Brief Explanation: WABA’s Montgomery County Action Committee hosted a walk-along tour of the planned Spring Street and Cedar Street protected bike lanes in downtown Silver Spring.  Representatives from Montgomery Department of Transportation joined to speak about the project planning process.

Current Status: Construction is expected to start this summer.

Action to Take: Get involved with the Montgomery County Action Committee! Meetings are the 4th Monday of each month at 7pm in the Civic Center in Silver Spring. More details here.

Updates to Park Rules and Regulations

Brief Explanation: The Maryland National Capital Parks and Planning Commission (M-NCPPC) is updating the rules and regulations governing the region’s parks. These rules are of particular interest to the bicycling community insofar as they govern the hours trails are open, speed limits on trails, the use of electronic bicycles on trails, and the right of way at trail crossings.

Current Status: WABA submitted letters to the Prince George’s and Montgomery County Planning Boards. The rules will be updated and finalized later this year. Download a copy of our letter here.

Big Funding Win for Bicyling in the Montgomery County Budget

Brief Explanation: Montgomery County Council unanimously approved the County’s 2017 Operating budget and six-year Capital Improvements Program. The budget maintains funding for a number of long- term trail and bikeway priorities AND increases funding for the Bicycle Pedestrian Priority Area Program by 150%! This was an initiative of Councilmember Hans Riemer, supported by WABA advocates.

Current Status: With this additional funding, Montgomery County Department of Transportation can do more great street safety projects at a faster rate, including careful study, planning and implementation of the network of protected bike lanes that will constitute the Silver Spring Circle.

Metropolitan Branch Trail—Several Steps Closer to Completion

Brief Explanation: Montgomery County Department of Transportation held a public hearing prior to beginning construction of the .6 mile portion of the MBT that crosses the Montgomery College Campus on Fenton Street and King Street and along the CSXT Railroad to Ripley Street. WABA participated in that meeting and also provided testimony to the Montgomery County Planning Board in support of the next phases of the project, which include contruction of a bicycle/pedestrian bridge connection over Georgia Avenue. You can read our testimony here.

Current Status: On May 19th, the Montgomery County Planning Board approved the plans for the next two phases of trail construction in the county. The next construction phase of this project will start later this summer, extending the trail up to King Street.


Washington D.C.

Contributory Negligence

Brief Explanation: The Judiciary Committee voted 3-0 to move the Motor Vehicle Collision Recovery Act of 2016 out of committee and recommended it for consideration by the full Council.

Current Status: The bill will be considered by the Committee of the Whole, possibly as soon as June 21st. The insurance industry has been busy trying to rally Councilmembers to vote against the bill, or to pressure Councilmember McDuffie to pull the bill prior to a vote, by making all manner of outrageously inaccurate claims. (For a taste, check out WABA’s Executive Director Greg Billing debating the merits of the bill with DC Insurance Federation Executive Director Wayne McOwen on this episode of the Kojo Nnamdi show).

Action to Take: Contact your Councilmembers and ask them to support the bill.

Benning Road Streetcar Project

Brief Explanation: Work continues on plans to extend the H St – Benning streetcar across the Anacostia River to the Benning Road Metro and towards Georgetown. In May, the District Department of Transportation (DDOT) hosted two public meetings to take comments on Environmental Assessments for both plans. If implemented well, these projects present important opportunities to expand bicycle access in the Benning Rd and K St. corridors. Without attention to key details, though, they pose serious threats to safety and access.

Current Status: The comment period has closed, but there will be further opportunity for comments when the final EA is released, estimated to be in the fall of 2016.

Bike Lanes Closures on L St

Brief Explanation: The protected bike lane on L St NW recently went form being the spine of a low-stress bike network to a dangerous mixing zone with automobiles and heavy trucks— the result of a permit issued by DDOT to Carr Properties, the company redeveloping the old Washington Post building.

Current Status: The current traffic pattern will be in place for more than two years, unless we manage to break through DDOT’s conviction that this consitutes a safe accommodation for bicyclists equivalent to a protected bike lane.

Action to Take: Unfortunately, options for recourse are limited at this point. We recommend contacting the Mayor and your Councilmembers.

Training for 911 Dispatchers

Brief Explanation: As part of a larger collaborative effort spearheaded by WABA to ensure that our city’s expanding network of trails are fully integrated into emergency services, WABA and DDOT’s trail teams held early morning trainings for all 911 dispatchers on how to respond to emergency calls from the Metropolitan Branch Trail. Dispatchers went through a refresher on the trail as we covered how to help callers spot the mile markers, reviewed the many trail intersections in the 911 database, and more broadly, provided context for the trail.

Current Status: Our next step is to lead a walking tour of the trail for dispatchers, per their request.

Traffic/Trail Counts During Rock Creek Park Road Closures

Brief Explanation: For many years, conversations about how Rock Creek Park could be operated so that it does more for non-motorized transportation have gone nowhere, in part because of disputes over the assumed impact any changes would have on traffic elsewhere in the District. This year, we have the opportunity to scientifically measure the traffic impact that will result from a series of road closures along Beach Drive during the road reconstruction. WABA sent a letter to the Mayor requesting that DDOT and National Park Service commit to a detailed traffic count from diversions of these road closures. Read our letter here.

Current Status: WABA staff will meet with DDOT and National Park Service officials this month to discuss the proposal.

Make bicycling better in YOUR neighborhood!

WABA is working to bring advocates together in our local jurisdictions to further our mission of a more bikeable region. The Action Committees empower residents with the tools, training and support needed to win campaigns for better biking infrastructure, policies, and programs.

We’re fine tuning the way this monthly(ish) update works, so if you have thoughts on how to make this information more useful, send a note to communications@waba.org.

Why is the L Street protected bike lane closed?

On the eve of Bike to Work Day, the protected bike lane on L Street NW went from being the spine of a low-stress bike network to a dangerous mixing zone with automobiles and heavy trucks.

Carr Properties, the company redeveloping the old Washington Post building, made the switch from demolition phase of their traffic control plan to the construction phase.

What you see now on the 1500 block of L St is what we will have for more than two years, unless we manage to break through DDOTs conviction that this constitutes a safe accommodation for bicyclists equal to a protected bike lane.

Background:

On March 18th, WABA sent a formal letter to DDOT to point out that the traffic control plan for the Carr Properties permit as issued was not compliant with the Bicycle Safety Amendment Act of 2013 or accompanying safe accommodation regulations. We proposed three compliant traffic control plan (TCP) alternatives that would have maintained the protected bike lane.  DDOT met with us to explain in detail the reasons they did not think any of our suggestions were feasible. They issued an official written response with this letter

At the root of agency’s argument is something called Level of Service, which is a measurement of how freely cars move on roads and through intersections. DDOT has made clear that the agency prioritized Level of Service metrics when deciding to skip over the safest options for accommodating bicyclists and pedestrians. DDOT’s letter states: “traffic analysis performed during the TCP review process indicated that taking another lane of travel would have resulted in failing levels of service at the intersections of both 16th and L street and 17th and L street NW.”  (Emphasis added). Using a Level of Service analysis in this context is contrary to both the letter and the spirit of the safe accommodations law and regulations.

It’s also worth noting that “failing levels of service” is not as catastrophic as it might sound. An F grade at an intersection means that… it takes a little longer to drive through the intersection.

So what exactly is a Level of Service Analysis?

Level of Service (“LOS”) is a performance metric for streets and roads that uses a scale of A-F to describe the amount of congestion a roadway or intersection experiences. It was originally used to rate interstate freeways during the highway boom of the 1950s and 60s.  At a certain point, traffic engineers began applying this standard to the rest of our street network. The problem with this is that most streets do not exist solely to move traffic through an area (like a highway), but rather, to serve homes, businesses, schools, churches, parks, and the people who live alongside them. Yet, in the pursuit of high LOS rankings, traffic engineers widen streets, remove parking, limit crosswalks, and deploy other strategies that make streets less safe for bicyclists and pedestrians, and less inviting in general.

Eliminating traffic congestion is not legally mandated; it is a self-imposed requirement that has become entrenched in the traffic engineering canon. A laser-focus on LOS street design for the hours of peak use encourages the overbuilding of streets for the remaining 22 hours of the day. In this case, LOS analysis has been used to justify non-compliance with the requirement to provide accommodations that replicate the safety level of the existing bicycle route.

What did DDOT get wrong here?

Under the Safe Accommodation regulations, DDOT is required to provide a protected bike lane adjacent to the motor vehicle lane as long as one motor vehicle lane can be maintained in the same direction of travel. The regulations are clear that safety accommodations for bicyclists should be afforded according to a prioritized scheme:

The method for providing the safe accommodation for bicyclists shall be prioritized as follows:

(1)       Closing a parking lane and keeping the adjacent bicycle lane open;

(2)       Shifting the bicycle lane to a location on the same roadway to by-pass the work zone, and if necessary, shifting and narrowing the adjacent motor vehicle traffic lanes; provided the adjacent motor vehicle travel lanes shall be maintained at no less than ten feet (10 ft.) wide;

(3)       Closing the adjacent motor vehicle travel lane to provide space for a bicycle lane; provided that a minimum of one (1) motor vehicle travel lane shall remain in the same direction of travel;

(4)       Merging the bicycle lane and the adjacent motor vehicle travel lane into a shared travel lane adjacent to the work zone, installing sharrow lane markings in the shared travel lane and installing work zone signage directing bicyclists to merge into the shared travel lane; provided the shared travel lane shall be maintained at no less than thirteen feet (13 ft.) wide; and

(5)       As a last resort, detouring bicyclists onto an adjacent roadway, in which case the detour route shall replicate, as closely as practicable, the level of safety found on the bicycle route being blocked.

There is no provision in the regulations for considering Level of Service. The safest practicable option must be selected from the list in the order provided. Currently, two lanes of traffic are open on L Street, which means that option three would be the correct selection for a safe accommodation for bicyclists on L street under the regulations.

Complete Streets and Vision Zero

DDOT adopted an internal Complete Streets policy in 2010. In all likelihood, DC Council will codify a Complete Streets policy before summer recess if/when they pass the Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Act Amendment of 2016 (B21-335). (More on this in an upcoming post). The concept of a Complete Streets policy is that all modes should be safely accommodated in the design of our regional streets and transit network.

In order to actually change the status quo and create streets for people, the Complete Streets policy elevates the safety of pedestrians, bicyclists, users of mass transit, people with disabilities, and the elderly over the convenience of motorists and freight providers.

The Complete Streets policy recognizes that certain streets have “modal priorities.” This was one of the justifications for not installing bike lanes on K street, which was determined to have a transit modal priority. L St and M St were selected for protected bike lanes in part because they are alternative parallel routes to K street. With the installation of world-class protected bike lanes on L and M Streets, and considering their significance in the transportation network for crossing the city by bike, it seems clear that on these streets, bicycle traffic should be considered the modal priority.

Moreover and most importantly, DC is a city pledged to Vision Zero—the initiative to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injury on our roadways by 2024. DDOT is the agency charged with leadership over this initiative. Prioritizing Level of Service for vehicles over the safety of bicyclists and pedestrians—even on streets to which bicyclists have already been diverted— on what constitutes an essential section of the protected bicycle network— flies in the face of the goals of Vision Zero, Complete Streets, and the Move DC plan.

Unfortunately, options for recourse are limited at this point. We recommend contacting the Mayor and your Councilmembers.

What about safe accommodations at other construction sites throughout the District?

When a contractor or developer applies for a permit to occupy public space during construction activities, they are required to submit a traffic control plan to DDOT for approval. Construction projects impacting our streets, bike lanes and sidewalks will generally fall into three categories:

1. The permit complies with the requirements of safe accommodations law and regulations, and the contractor is properly following the permit.

Remedy: Patience. This won’t last forever.

2.  DDOT has approved a legally compliant traffic control permit, but the contractor is not in compliance with the requirements of the permit as-issued.

Remedy: Contact the Public Space Regulation Administration at DDOT (202-442-4670) and report a suspected permit violation.  Take photos if you can, and be prepared to provide a street address or intersection, as well as what makes the accommodation (or lack thereof) dangerous. The public space team will send staff to inspect the construction area and may issue a stop work order until the contractor complies with the traffic control plan.

If you have time to do a little research, many approved traffic control plans are now available online at tops.ddot.dc.gov (the system can be cumbersome, so for quick requests the phone is probably your best option).  There is a “Search Permits and Applications” link at the bottom right hand corner of the landing page.  From the jump page select “Occupancy” and then submit search criteria (tracking or permit number if known is the best way—permit numbers are printed on the Emergency No Parking signs).  While not all approved Traffic Control Permits are viewable, the ones related to construction staging zones are. These are the ones most likely to include changes to sidewalks and bike lanes.

3. Contractors have been issued a legally deficient permit by DDOT.

Remedy: This is trickier, but the end result must be that DDOT amends the permit to comply with the law. WABA will be working with DDOT officials to create a guidance manual to give permitting and engineering staff at DDOT the tools they need to properly evaluate traffic control plans in permit applications for compliance with the safe accommodations requirements for bicycles.

As we all know, DC is a rapidly growing city and there are construction projects everywhere. This is all the more reason it is essential that DDOT get these permits—and their enforcement— right.

 

MoCo Council Backs A Massive Expansion in Bike Funding for Priority Areas

Photo from CDOT

Soon, this may be a common sight in Silver Spring

On Thursday, May 26th the Montgomery County Council unanimously approved the County’s 2017 Operating Budget and six-year Capital Improvements Program (CIP). In addition to maintaining funding for a number of long term trail and bikeway priorities, the Council approved a dramatic, 150%, funding increase for the Bicycle Pedestrian Priority Area Program. Alongside the innovative methods in the Bike Master Plan rewrite, movement on long delayed trail projects like the Capital Crescent and Metropolitan Branch Trails, and December’s commitment to pursue a Vision Zero initiative  this expansion in funding is another sign that Montgomery County is getting serious about supporting and encouraging bicycling.

In 2014, the County created the Bicycle Pedestrian Priority Area (BPPA) program to direct funding and resources to areas where changes will have the greatest effect on the safety and popularity of biking and walking. Since then, some 30 BPPAs have been designated and as many projects identified. With a $1 million yearly budget spread across even a few areas, planning and implementation of these projects are progressing well, though perhaps not as fast as they could — a new sidewalk and bulb-outs here, a protected bike lane there, a few bike racks and streetlights.  That is progress, but it takes more than spot improvements to change behaviors and get more people riding bikes when neighborhood roads feel like speedways.

In March, Councilmember Hans Riemer proposed a $1.5 million per year funding increase for this program as well as concentrated attention to projects in the Silver Spring BPPA first. WABA’s action alert generated considerable support from Silver Spring residents and committed bicycle advocates around the county. Roger Berliner, Nancy Floreen, and Tom Hucker who make up the Council’s Committee on Transportation, Infrastructure, Energy and Environment (T&E) all voted in support of the plan. Considering the inherent negotiations and changes required to find agreement on a complicated budget, we are thrilled to report that the County will dedicate a total of $15 million to BPPA projects over the next six years!

With this additional funding, Montgomery County Department of Transportation (MCDOT) can do more at a faster rate. In Silver Spring, where demand for safe places to bike is on the rise, more funding allows resources for careful study, planning and implementation of a connected network of protected bike lanes. Soon, construction will begin on the Spring and Cedar St protected bike lanes. Next year, expect discussion on Second Ave, Cameron St, Wayne Ave, Dixon St and Fenton Ave. And, while MCDOT builds out the Silver Spring Circle, planning can begin for needed improvements in Glenmont, Grosvenor, Wheaton and eventually the 28 other BPPAs. Instead of spot improvements, MCDOT can build entire networks.

We’d like to thank Councilmember Hans Riemer, the T&E Committee, and the County Council for leadership and commitment to expanding the role of bicycling in the county. Thanks also to everyone who wrote and called your councilmembers in support of this proposal.

Curious about what’s going on around biking in Montgomery County?

Attend the the 3rd Great MoCo Bicycle Summit on Saturday, June 18, hosted by Councilmember Hans Riemer.

What: 3rd Great MoCo Bicycle Summit
When: Saturday, June 18 10-12 pm
Where: Council Office Building, 100 Maryland Ave, Rockville

Register to attend (free)

Meet Bryon, our new Vision Zero Campaign Coordinator

Bryon Burgin

Hi there!

My name is Bryon Burgin and I am the new Vision Zero Campaign Coordinator.

I recently relocated to the DC area from my hometown of St. Louis, Missouri after completing  my J.D. and M.A. in Urban Planning and Real Estate Development from Saint Louis University. I received my B.A. in Political Science from the University of Missouri. As a former bike shop manager and life-long cyclist, I welcome every chance to engage with you to promote bike ridership, trails, policy, law, transportation planning and creative ways to develop more connected, safe, diverse and sustainable neighborhoods for all.

My interest in Vision Zero is very simple: no one should ever die using our roads. Vision Zero  is an all-hands-on-deck approach to transportation safety. To prevent fatalities and serious injuries to travelers of our transportation system, we will pursue commitments from policymakers, traffic engineers, law enforcement officials, local businesses and road users from all backgrounds to end road fatalities and serious injury within a decade. I look forward to utilizing my past community development experiences with Habitat for Humanity to build support in our local communities. We need to formulate new attitudes and behaviors towards street safety and generate a true regional commitment to Vision Zero.

Together, we can change how our region values bike safety for generations to come. Please feel free to contact me at Bryon.Burgin@waba.org to learn more about WABA’s work to secure a regional commitment to Vision Zero. We can’t do this without you!

Jerseys and Socks and T-Shirts, Oh My!

New WABA Merchandise has arrived!

Get some cool WABA gear courtesy of the good folks at Primal, WABA’s Official Merch Sponsor!

 

jersey

Let the world know about your support for Better Bicycling in style with a high quality, moisture-wicking, full zip jersey by Primal!

 

waba socks

Make sure your feet are sending the right message with a pair of WABA Better Bicycling socks by Primal!

 

tshirts

Looking for something to wear on those rare occasions you’re not on your bike? Our stylish t-shirts help you show off all of the ways WABA makes bicycling better!

 

stickers

Turn anything into a bike advocacy centerpiece with new WABA stickers!
Available in English and Spanish.

 

Pick up your very own WABA gear and show your support today!

Are you a WABA Member? Email membership@waba.org
to get a discount code for 20% off your purchase!

 

Primal Logo