It wouldn’t cost much to make this Prince George’s road safer for everyone

by Jeff Lemieux 
Cross-posted at Greater Greater Washington.

Suitland Road, a major thoroughfare in Prince George’s County, offers nothing for people who walk, ride bikes, or take the bus. There’s enough room to make the road nicer and safer for everybody, and the cost would be tiny.

Proposal for Suitland Road. Illustration by the author.

Suitland Road is a rural-style, two-lane road that passes through a nondescript commercial patch on the way from DC to the Suitland Federal Center. It has no sidewalks or bike lanes between Southern Avenue in DC and Silver Hill Road in MD, and and its wide traffic lanes (16 feet in some places) encourage speeding. However, it will soon be the hub for new development next to the federal center and near the Metro station.

Suitland Road in its current condition. Photo by the author.

The Washington Area Bicyclist Association Prince George’s action committee has made transforming Suitland Road into a bike friendly space a top priority for 2015. The committee published a proposal to repurpose Suitland Road’s wide traffic lanes, center turn lanes, and shoulder space to a street with protected space for biking and walking on either side. There’d be no need for additional asphalt, or even sidewalk paving.


Suitland Road between Maryland and DC. Image from Google Maps.

All things considered, the suggested changes are cheap

Adding the protected bike lanes and walk space that are in WABA’s proposal would cost between $80,000 and $165,000, with annual maintenance costs of less than $10,000. Of course, actual sidewalks, along with bus platforms and landscaping, would be nice. But the idea is to calm traffic and make Suitland Road safer for people on bikes and foot as quickly and inexpensively as possible.WABA’s proposal uses flexposts, a “soft” bike lane protector that’s common in DC, rather than more expensive curbing or a raised roadbed for bike lanes. The cost estimates also cover bike symbols, lane and buffer striping, and changing existing pavement lines.There are two main approaches to lane striping. The first, thermoplastic lines (hot tape), would cost about $165,000 to install. They’d carry an annual maintenance price tag of about $1,200.

The other option would be to use white paint for the lane markings. This would cost about $80,000 upfront, with $9,600 in annual maintenance.

On a per-mile basis, these cost estimates are considerably lower than most types of roadway improvements. The estimates, meant to provide ballpark figures rather than specifics, are from an engineer familiar with the proposal.

The Maryland State Highway Administration, which maintains Suitland Road, recently added road design guidelines that include buffered striping for bike lanes along with curbed protection features. WABA’s proposal uses flexposts, a “soft” bike lane protector that’s common in DC, instead of curbing or a raised roadbed for bike lanes.

The Suitland Civic Association, WABA, and local bike shops are planning a community walk to advocate for a better Suitland Road on April 4th.